Remember Silverstein, the dude who cashed some billions insurance for the WTC towers that fell on 9/11?
I’ve often likened that event and the Plandemic and guess what: the Plandemic has its own Silversteins. Possibly same ones at the top of the tops.

About a year ago I wrote a big expose on how the banksters and the mob that gravitate around the World Bank set up the current world order and the Plandemic. I’m afraid you have to start there, no way around it if you want to get the big picture.
Also read: (1ST ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL) SOROS A ROTHSCHILD FRONTMAN, FORGED IMF-CHINA ALLIANCE. WE’RE LIVING THE CONSEQUENCES
I’ve never stopped adding evidence since and it’s overflowing. This new piece deserves its own feature.

THE SHORT COURSE

THE LONG COURSE, BECAUSE EVIL HIDES IN DETAILS

May 2016 – The World Bank announces the creation of the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF)

The event took place at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Governors meeting in Sendai, Japan. The PEF is a scheme to channel funding to countries facing a major disease outbreak with pandemic potential.

2017 – The creation of the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board

The Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) is an independent monitoring and accountability body co-convened by the World Bank and World Health Organization, created in response to recommendations by the UN Secretary General’s Global Health Crises Task Force in 2017.

Despite progress made since the West Africa Ebola crisis in 2014/15, GPMB’s 2019 report, A World At Risk noted an increasingly dire risk of widespread epidemics, and found that the world remained unprepared. GPMB warned that epidemic-prone diseases like Ebola, influenza and SARS were increasingly difficult to manage in the face of prolonged conflict, fragile states, and forced migration.

June 2017 – World Bank Launches First-Ever Pandemic Bonds to Support $500 Million Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility

Washington, DC, June 28, 2017 – The World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development) today launched specialized bonds aimed at providing financial support to the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF), a facility created by the World Bank to channel surge funding to developing countries facing the risk of a pandemic.

This marks the first time that World Bank bonds are being used to finance efforts against infectious diseases, and the first time that pandemic risk in low-income countries is being transferred to the financial markets.

The PEF will provide more than $500 million to cover developing countries against the risk of pandemic outbreaks over the next five years, through a combination of bonds and derivatives priced today, a cash window, and future commitments from donor countries for additional coverage.

The transaction, that enables PEF to potentially save millions of lives, was oversubscribed by 200% reflecting an overwhelmingly positive reception from investors and a high level of confidence in the new World Bank sponsored instrument. With such strong demand, the World Bank was able to price the transaction well below the original guidance from the market. The total amount of risk transferred to the market through the bonds and derivatives is $425 million.

“With this new facility, we have taken a momentous step that has the potential to save millions of lives and entire economies from one of the greatest systemic threats we face,” World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said. “We are moving away from the cycle of panic and neglect that has characterized so much of our approach to pandemics. We are leveraging our capital market expertise, our deep understanding of the health sector, our experience overcoming development challenges, and our strong relationships with donors and the insurance industry to serve the world’s poorest people. This creates an entirely new market for pandemic risk insurance. Drawing on lessons from the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa, the Facility will help improve health security for everyone. I especially want to thank the World Health Organization and the governments of Japan and Germany for their support in launching this new mechanism.”

Source

The World Bank announced the creation of the PEF in May 2016 at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Governors meeting in Sendai, Japan. The PEF will quickly channel funding to countries facing a major disease outbreak with pandemic potential. Its unique financing structure combines funding from the bonds issued today with over-the-counter derivatives that transfer pandemic outbreak risk to derivative counterparties. The structure was designed to attract a wider, more diverse set of investors.

The PEF has two windows. The first is an ‘insurance’ window with premiums funded by Japan and Germany, consisting of bonds and swaps including those executed today. The second is a ‘cash’ window, for which Germany provided initial funding of Euro 50 million. The cash window will be available from 2018 for the containment of diseases that may not be eligible for funding under the insurance window.

The bonds and derivatives for the PEF’s ‘insurance’ window were developed by the World Bank Treasury in cooperation with leading reinsurance companies Swiss Re and Munich Re. AIR Worldwide was the sole modeler, using the AIR Pandemic Model to provide expert risk analysis. Swiss Re Capital Markets is the sole book runner for the transaction. Swiss Re Capital Markets and Munich Re are the joint structuring agents. Munich Re and GC Securities, a division of MMC Securities LLC are co-managers.

Swiss Re Capital Markets Limited, Munich Re and GC Securities were also joint arrangers on the derivatives transactions.

The bonds will be issued under IBRD’s “capital at risk” program because investors bear the risk of losing part or all of their investment in the bond if an epidemic event triggers pay-outs to eligible countries covered under the PEF.

The PEF covers six viruses that are most likely to cause a pandemic. These include new Orthomyxoviruses (new influenza pandemic virus A), Coronaviridae (SARS, MERS), Filoviridae (Ebola, Marburg) and other zoonotic diseases (Crimean Congo, Rift Valley, Lassa fever).

PEF financing to eligible countries will be triggered when an outbreak reaches predetermined levels of contagion, including number of deaths; the speed of the spread of the disease; and whether the disease crosses international borders.

The determinations for the trigger are made based on publicly available data as reported by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Countries eligible for financing under the PEF’s insurance window are members of the International Development Association (IDA), the institution of the World Bank Group that provides concessional finance for the world’s poorest countries. The PEF will be governed by a Steering Body, whose voting members include Japan and Germany. WHO and the World Bank serve as non-voting members.

The World Bank has developed some of the most innovative catastrophe risk insurance instruments in the market to help developing countries manage risk. In the past ten years the institution has executed approximately $1.6 billion in catastrophe risk transactions.

IBRD Pandemic Bonds Distribution by Investor Type and Location
Distribution by Investor TypeClass AClass B
Dedicated Catastrophe Bond Investor61.7%35.3%
Endowment3.3%6.3%
Asset Manager20.6%16.3%
Pension Fund14.4%42.1%
Distribution by Investor LocationClass AClass B
US27.9%15.0%
Europe71.8%82.9%
Bermuda0.1%2.1%
Japan0.2%0.0%
IBRD Pandemic Bonds Summary Terms and Conditions*
Type of NoteClass AClass B
Issuer:International Bank for Reconstruction and DevelopmentInternational Bank for Reconstruction and Development
Trade Date:June 28, 2017June 28, 2017
Final Size (Bond only)**USD 225 millionUSD 95 million
Settlement Date:July 7, 2017 July 7, 2017
Scheduled Maturity Date:July 15, 2020 extendable monthly in whole or in part, up to a maximum of 12 months following the Scheduled Maturity DateJuly 15, 2020 extendable monthly in whole or in part, up to a maximum of 12 months following the Scheduled Maturity Date
Issue Price:100%100%
Bond Coupon:6m USD LIBOR +6.50%6m USD LIBOR +11.10%
Covered Perils:Flu, CoronavirusFilovirus, Coronavirus, Lassa Fever, Rift Valley Fever and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever
Redemption Amount:The Notes will not be fully repaid if an event occursThe Notes will not be fully repaid if an event occurs

 (*) Please see the Supplemental Prospectus for a detailed description of the Terms and Conditions of the bonds, the related risks with regard to an investment in the bonds and the relevant offering restrictions. Any offer of the bonds will solely take place on the basis of the Supplemental Prospectus prepared by the World Bank or on behalf of the World Bank. 
(**) There was an additional $105 million size done in the derivatives market.

Our take out from this?
Remember the strange numbers reported during the first “casedemic of 2020”? They determined how much money WB pays and to whom.
But WB and the funky bunch are also behind WHO, so it’s safe to say controlled the situation at all times and could arbitrarily decide whatever.

WORLD BANK SAYS COVID-19 TEST KITS ARE BEING SOLD SINCE 2017

2018 – World Bank Group’s Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF) Welcomes Australia as New Donor

WASHINGTON, JUNE 21, 2018 — The World Bank Group’s Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF)  welcomes Australia as a donor to the PEF, joining Japan and Germany. Australia is contributing US$7.2 million to the PEF’s Cash Window, which was set up through an initial contribution from Germany. Australia will also now be a voting member of the PEF Steering Body.

“With this contribution to the PEF, Australia is supporting the scaling up of national and international responses to infectious disease outbreaks,” said the Hon Julie Bishop MP, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Australia“We are committed to working with international partners to reduce the risk of global pandemics and improve health security for all.”

“The PEF ensures that we break the cycle of panic and neglect which has so far characterized the global approach to pandemics,” said Annette Dixon, Vice President, Human Development at the World Bank Group. “It is a key example of the World Bank Group’s commitment to creating innovative financing mechanisms to tackle complex global challenges, working with country governments, donors, international partners and the private sector.”

“The robust and swift contribution of the PEF just in the past week has underlined its role as a new model for financing pandemic response with speed and flexibility,” said Mukesh Chawla, Coordinator of the PEF and Advisor, World Bank Group. “It ensures that money is never the reason holding back effective response.”

The PEF, set up by the World Bank Group in partnership with Japan, Germany, the World Health Organization (WHO), and private sector partners, has been operational since July 2017 and consists of both a cash and an insurance component.  The PEF’s $425 million Insurance Window with premiums funded by Japan and Germany, consists of bonds placed on the capital markets. This would be triggered if a much larger, multi-country response is needed. All activation criteria are based upon publicly available data provided by the WHO. The PEF covers 78 of the world’s poorest countries against pandemic threats and is the first mechanism to be expressly designed for this purpose.


Source

May 2019 – updates on Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility


Image

Click here to zoom in.


The Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF) – a financing mechanism housed at the World Bank  –  is designed to provide an additional source of financing to help the world’s poorest countries respond to cross-border, large-scale outbreaks.  The PEF complements the much larger role that IDA, the World Bank’s fund for the poorest countries, and other international organizations and donors play in financing outbreak response. The PEF’s design is unique in that payments can go directly to governments and pre-approved frontline responder organizations (such as WHO & UNICEF) and it can do so through either its cash window — or once triggered through its insurance window.

Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF) Framework

PEF Operational Brief

PEF Operations Manual

PEF Accreditation Guidelines

PEF Prospectus (Term Sheet)

PEF Brochure | Spanish | French | Russian

February 2020 – Is the whole thing is designed to fail?

The Street does a really good job at explaining the scheme:
“In June 2017, the World Bank — the international financial institution that provides loans to poorer countries — sold around $425 million (€391 million) worth of bonds and derivatives aimed at providing financial support to developing countries facing the risk of a pandemic.

The less risky tranche of the bonds will not be paid back to investors if there are more than 2,500 deaths in developing countries as a result of a pandemic. Although China has recorded more than this number of deaths, the World Bank does not designate it a developing country.

By far the riskier of the two bonds is “Class B,” which sold $95 million in bonds (compared to $225 million for the less risky “Class A,” explained above). For Class B, if the disease crosses an international border and if there are at least 20 deaths in that second country, the investors’ money will be paid to developing countries dealing with the outbreak.

I do not come up with $425 million total. $225 million plus $95 million does not total $425 million.

Only those class B bonds are going to trigger.

An international crisis is brewing. There are 19 deaths in Iran, 12 in Italy, and 12 in South Korea.

One more death in Iran is all it takes unless there are other restrictions.

Designed to Fail

Bodo Ellmers, the director of the Global Policy Forum’s sustainable development finance program told the Financial Times the instrument was “useless.”

You obviously want to prevent a pandemic but it only pays out when it becomes a pandemic,” he said.

Olga Jones, who worked as an economist at the World Bank for three decades, said it was absurd that discussions for a second round of bonds for what is known officially as the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF) had begun, as they were effectively “designed to fail.”

Many critics have also pointed to the fact that the severe attack of Ebola that hit the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2018 did not meet the conditions to trigger payment of the pandemic bonds despite the fact that almost 500 people died and that it was one of the largest outbreaks ever recorded.

Payout and Maturity

The Class A bonds feature an interest rate of 7% while the Class B bonds’ rate is 11%.

According to the PEF, around $75.5 million had been paid to bondholders in the form of premiums as of August 2019. The full amount paid in interest and coupons has not been disclosed. The bonds are set to mature in July 2020.

Painful Problem

The Wall Street Journal discusses the Painful Problem With Pandemic Bonds

“The idea behind pandemic bonds, issued by the World Bank in 2017, is simple: They pay investors a solid return, but if a pandemic breaks out, the principal is redirected to help low-income countries pay for their emergency response.

An investor who doesn’t do the legwork is liable to get burned when the bonds don’t behave as expected. At 386 pages, the prospectus for the World Bank’s class-B securities isn’t a light read.

The second and larger problem with pandemic bonds is one they don’t share with other catastrophe-related securities. During extreme events, they don’t offer a source of returns uncorrelated with major capital markets—one of the things buyers like most about the asset class.

Pandemic bonds are most likely to be triggered just as equities tumble and concerns about companies’ ability to finance themselves come to the fore, as now. In short, the asset class is uncorrelated with wider markets—except at the exact moment when that matters most. Then it is suddenly very correlated.”

Questions Abound

These bonds pay interest. How does the Wold Bank pay that interest?

Generally, companies issue bonds for expansion and expect to pay the debt back from future profits or current income.

What is the World Bank invested in or doing with the money to pay way above market rates?

Only the $95 million in class B bonds will trigger. But at 11% interest with a maturity date coming up, most of that money has been paid out.

Even if some developing nations do end up receiving pandemic bond money, it will be a trivial sum when compared with the economic damage from a sustained coronavirus pandemic.

Meanwhile the class A bond buyers have been collecting 7% with virtually no chance of losing their money by July of 2020 because China is not a developing nation.

The whole setup makes no sense unless failure was the intent all along.” – The Street

Or, unless it’s designed to not trigger more than conveniently, like electronic poker. – Silview

Intent is the hardest thing to demonstrate in the justice system. Except in this case. WB put years of effort in elaborating a “maze of confusion” when it comes to the bonds’ triggers, to avoid payment, as a former WB expert testifies in the Bloomberg video below. All that effort weighs now as evidence of premeditation. There’s literally a few kilos of evidence available, if printed.

The Guardian got it, but can’t fully say it

World Bank’s $500m pandemic scheme accused of ‘waiting for people to die’

Bonds designed to provide fast funding for poor countries branded ‘obscene’ because of complex payout criteria

A flagship $500m World Bank scheme to help the poorest countries deal with a health emergency is “too little too late” for the coronavirus outbreak, say health experts.

The first pandemic emergency financing (PEF) bonds were launched in 2017 by Jim Yong Kim, the bank’s president at the time, after the Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Designed to potentially “save millions of lives and entire economies” by speedily funnelling money to nations facing pandemics.

But critics say the “insanely complicated” terms of the high-interest bonds are heavily skewed towards investors, while for the victims any payouts may come too late, if at all.

One economist described the bonds, payouts from which depend on how deadly the outbreak is, as “obscene”.

Olga Jonas, a senior fellow at Harvard Global Health Institute who was an economist at the World Bank for three decades, said: “The whole mechanism is highly unfortunate. The objectives were to help the poorest countries respond quickly to outbreaks. Infectious disease spreads exponentially and the coronavirus has a very rapid growth rate. But the bonds only get triggered when the disease has spread for a long time.”

Jonas, who has analysed the bonds’ terms, said they were “so convoluted, it is not at all clear whether they will pay out at all. It is too little, too late – and in this case, maybe never.

“What’s obscene is that the World Bank set it up this way. It waits for people to die.”

Funds can only be released after a certain amount of time and in accordance with complex criteria including outbreak size, growth rate, deadlines and death tolls. In the case of coronavirus, the bonds would not pay out until 12 weeks after the World Health Organization (WHO) publishes its first “situation report”, which would not be until 23 March. Another criterion is that the outbreak is still growing.

The bonds, funded by donor nations Japan and Germany, deliver interest payments to investors until the conditions for an infectious disease outbreak are triggered.

The value of the bonds has halved as the coronavirus outbreak has spread, raising fears investors could face losses.

Meanwhile, the WHO has appealed for £520m for “frontline efforts” to contain coronavirus. The disease has infected more than 82,000 people and killed over 2,800 people in 51 countries to date, but has not yet been declared a pandemic by the WHO.

Clare Wenham, assistant professor in global health policy at the London School of Economics, said: “If you really wanted to ensure global health security you would link the payout of the bonds to a decision around declaring a public health emergency of international concern or a national emergency.”

Wenham co-authored a paper criticising pandemic bonds in which it was found that more money was paid out to investors than to countries facing disease outbreaks. Payments would have only been triggered in two out of more than 60 disease outbreaks analysed – Ebola in west Africa and rift valley fever in 2006, the paper found.

Wenham said: “If the aim of it is to prevent pandemics, why would you wait for arbitrary numbers? Global health security is predicated on prevention rather than response, so waiting for it to get to a certain number of deaths in a certain number of countries before they pay out, is counterintuitive. It is not fit for purpose.

“No one has thought about it holistically. If public health officials have made a declaration of a global health emergency of international concern, there should be some mechanism for financing so that the WHO doesn’t have to go around the houses asking for money.”

Bodo Ellmers, director of Global Policy Forum’s sustainable development finance programme, said: “The idea was that it would be a quick instrument, but it was set up with such stringent criteria that the risk for investors is very low. The design, taking the number of dead people as a criteria, is very cynical.”

The scheme’s “fundamental flaw” is that it was aimed at preventing a pandemic but would only pay out when a pandemic was already underway, said Ellmers.

The World Bank said a PEF payout had been triggered after the Ebola outbreak of 2018 and 2019 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, providing a total of $61.4m to fight the disease.

The bank added that it has rolled out a series of tools to better assist countries during critical outbreaks, epidemics and pandemic threats.

It is capable of fast-tracking funds via existing projects and could fund emergency operations within three months – although in past cases, such as Ebola, it had provided support within two weeks.

Around the same time, February 2020, Washington Examiner doesn’t have the guts to put out such conclusion, but confirms pretty much everything else:

“Investors betting big against catastrophic diseases are watching the World Health Organization closely as insurance bonds tied to whether the organization labels COVID-19 a pandemic are set to mature in June.

In 2017, the World Bank designed a new way to raise money: Pandemic Emergency Financing bonds. Over $425 million worth of such bonds, which bet against a global outbreak of infectious diseases and will default if WHO declares the coronavirus a pandemic, were sold by the World Bank in its first-ever issuance of catastrophe bonds. In the event of no pandemic, investors would be paid a healthy annualized return. Meanwhile, the World Bank could use the bonds to insure itself against the risk of a global outbreak.

“As an investor, we do not want to lose money,” said Chin Liu, a portfolio manager at Amundi Pioneer, a Boston-based firm that purchased the bonds as a way to diversify the company’s $1 billion catastrophe fund. “But then, we also understand if it’s unfortunately triggered, it benefits every single person, including ourselves, to keep the virus controlled.”

For large-scale investors looking for above-average returns in a bloated market, the bonds were the next logical place to hedge against disaster. At the time of issuance, then-World Bank President Jim Yong-Kim heralded the bonds as an opportunity to leverage “capital market expertise to serve the world’s poorest people.”

The bonds were administered in two tranches, with Class A bond investors receiving a return of 6.9% annually. Class B bond investors received 11.5% annually. The World Bank raised $225 million in Class A bonds and $95 million in Class B bonds.

The investors, mainly endowments and pension funds, have long bet against natural disasters such as hurricanes, but the 2017 issuance of the bonds marked a shift in the market. Before, investors were betting on the wind speed of hurricanes, but now, they were betting on the likelihood of an infectious disease that could tear through nations across the globe.

“This marks the first time that World Bank bonds are being used to finance efforts against infectious diseases, and the first time that pandemic risk in low-income countries is being transferred to the financial markets,” read a statement from the World Bank at the time of issuance.

The conditions under which the payout on bonds will default are staggered based on how rapidly the disease spreads, the number of deaths associated with the illness, and whether the virus crosses international borders.

March 2020 -more people start to wake up to the scam.

Jacobin Mag: “Twelve weeks passed on March 23, and death is raining down on countries rich and poor. More than 770,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported worldwide, and in some places, infections and deaths are doubling every few days. Yet the World Bank says that eligible countries — so far Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nigeria, Cambodia, Senegal, and Nepal — won’t know if they will get any money until April 9 at the earliest.

This is despicable. Even wealthy countries are failing to contain the deadly virus. Poor countries that, for centuries, have seen their wealth and resources pilfered and plundered by rich nations, are facing down a tidal wave of infection and death without adequate medical supplies and facilities. Millions of people in these countries have compromised immune systems due to malnutrition, live in housing and communities that make social distancing impossible, and lack even the most basic necessities of disease prevention, such as access to water and soap for handwashing.

However, in this moment of crisis, when every second counts, global capital is sitting on its hands, holding desperately needed funds hostage as investors decide whether they are required to honor their end of the deal.

The pandemic bonds were advertised by the World Bank as a great way to “tackle social ills through private investment.” Instead, the bonds are yet another example of how hollow most so-called ESG investment is. They demonstrate how private investors have an uncanny ability to profit from social ills — and how, even in times when global solidarity is desperately needed, global capital can’t seem to look past the bottom line.”

APRIL 2020 – THE WORLD IS SCANDALIZED, THE WORLD BANK ACCEPTS TO PAY A LITTLE OVER HALF THE MONEY

The beginning of the month sees surprising attacks on WB, even from usual allies, who probably have to think of their media reputation before WB’s

So, finally, on April 20, 2020, WB makes the big announcement:

“All activation criteria including outbreak size, spread and growth have been met,” the World Bank said in an update on its website, referring to the coronavirus outbreak, adding PEF bonds and swaps were expected to pay out $195.84 million. (Out of 322 milion – S.m)

A steering body will now meet to determine how to allocate the funds to so-called IDA countries – a group of 76 of the world’s poorest nations, the World Bank said. The committee is made up of Australia, Germany, Japan, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the World Bank, and two IDA countries – currently Haiti and Liberia…

Campaigners have also been critical of the complex structure of the instrument, which requires five variables on the number of deaths, the velocity of its spread and its geographical spread to be reached before paying out.

This had been an obstacle to quick deployment, said Bodo Ellmers, director of sustainable development finance at Global Policy Forum, an independent policy watchdog.

“If those funds had been paid out earlier they could have been used to prevent the spread in some of those poor countries – the later you intervene the costlier it gets, in terms both of lives and money needed to remedy the situation,” he said.

Deutsche Welle reports: “The World Bank’s bond sale was 200% oversubscribed, meaning investors saw moneymaking opportunities with the high-yield returns on offer. Most buyers came from Europe, and included specialized catastrophe bond investors as well as asset managers and pension funds.

According to Bloomberg, asset managers including Bailie Gifford, Amundi and Stone Ridge Asset Management are among those who hold the riskier Class B bonds.

The interest and coupon payments made to investors have been funded largely by the donor nations Japan and Germany.  The Class A bonds feature an interest rate of 7% while the Class B bonds’ rate is 11%.

According to the PEF, around $75.5 million had been paid to bondholders in the form of premiums as of August 2019. The full amount paid in interest and coupons has not been disclosed. The bonds are set to mature in July 2020.”

We later found out that investors made about 96 million in 2020.
The governments who donated for this have no money of their own, they spend your money.

December – 2020 WB still pounded by media and investors for PEF’s failure:

India Times delivered the best indictment in mainstream media, from what I’ve seen so far:

How pandemic bonds became the world’s most controversial investment

In late January 2015, just after the deadliest outbreak of Ebola in history, then-World Bank President Jim Yong Kim stood in front of a group of Georgetown University students and professors to introduce a new approach to fighting pandemics.

Fresh from the annual gathering of power brokers and policy makers in Davos, Kim described a new type of financial product – “pandemic bonds” – that he hoped would persuade private investors to swell the World Bank’s coffers. …

Five years later, Summers had some different words for Kim, though you probably won’t hear the former World Bank president repeat them in public. The approach was “a dumb idea,” Summers said in a February 2020 email to a Harvard colleague seen by Bloomberg News. Modeled on catastrophe debt that pays insurance claims on natural disasters, the program was too complicated and ultimately unnecessary, he suggested, “like me insuring my toaster.”

Trumpeted by the World Bank at their launch as an innovative example of a public-private partnership, pandemic bonds have since become the subject of intense criticism for failing to divert money fast enough to battle deadly waves of Ebola and Covid-19. Academics from Harvard to the London School of Economics have lambasted the program for being ineffective and expensive, and the World Bank has confirmed it won’t issue a second round of the debt.

But the pandemic bonds weren’t designed to default at the earliest sign of a pandemic. The 386-page prospectus for the debt covered a range of outbreaks including Ebola, influenza and coronaviruses and spelled out very specific conditions for writedown – an effort to automate the typically political process of distributing funds. The list of triggers was long and complex, balancing investors’ desires for a long payout stream with the World Bank’s need to disburse the money to countries that need it. “We had to think through how this instrument should actually function, what kind of diseases should be addressed,” said Ivo Menzinger, who leads the group responsible for public sector solutions at Swiss Re. “During that process it got considerably broader.”…

when Ebola returned in 2018 to ravage West Africa again, the bonds failed to trigger. The virus killed almost 2,300 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, but per the criteria in the prospectus, it didn’t spread far enough, fast enough to qualify as a pandemic. In an effort to avoid political grappling over donor funds, the pandemic bonds relied on mechanical triggers that failed to fire. So investors kept getting paid interest and retained their principal. Meanwhile, the World Bank allocated $61 million from the PEF’s “cash window” – the discretionary portion of money funded by donor contributions – to help fight the outbreaks.

Even when Covid-19 began to sweep the globe earlier this year, it was unclear whether the bonds would get written down. The coronavirus had killed almost 150,000 people in dozens of countries before the casualty rates aligned with the “exponential growth” requirement set out in the bond prospectus. On April 16, more than five weeks after the WHO had declared a global pandemic, AIR Worldwide issued a report confirming that the conditions for a writedown had been met, diverting $132.5 million to the World Bank for disbursement. A further $63.3 million came from the swaps struck with Munich Re and Swiss Re.

“The triggers had to be late and they had to be convoluted and complex to reduce the probability that the financing would be triggered,” says Olga Jonas, a critic of the bonds who worked for more than three decades at the World Bank …

Meanwhile, the World Bank quietly announced it would not be issuing a second round of the debt. Unlike the launch of the pandemic bonds, the news came with little fanfare; it was just one line added to their website.

“The issues raised by COVID-19 are profound and require a deep rethinking of our pandemic response infrastructure,” Kim said. “If we can say that the PEF got it wrong, it wouldn’t be the only institution or instrument that got it wrong.”

Read more at:
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/markets/bonds/how-pandemic-bonds-became-the-worlds-most-controversial-investment/articleshow/79655582.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

What silview.media makes of all these facts

Learning what we have learned about the World Bank worrying about an impending economic collapse and, in parallel, setting up this pandemic, one may be confused how all this falls together in the grand scheme. Failing to see it is due to overcomplication, I suspect. Brush off the meaningless details and go for the essential questions:

How did this work, most basically?
Fabricated disease fearmongering and unrealistic promises persuaded some fools to transfer money to some con artists, under various pretenses.
WHO benefitted?
The con artists and the Great Reset budgets.
Who lost?
The total morons who haven’t yet learned why it’s not good to swim with sharks, no matter how you see yourself. And if it’s not good to swim with them, giving them money sounds even dumber.
Where have we seen this “business model” before?
Vaccines / WHO / GAVI…

EPILOGUE

APRIL 2021: WHO BOSS MENTIONS THE BONDS ON THE LIST OF THEIR PAST SUCCESSES

Around min. 13 in the video below.

MARCH 2021: WB RELAUNCHES CATASTROPHE BONDS

POP QUIZ: IF YOU PAID ATTENTION, BESIDES CORONAVIRUSES, WHAT OTHER VIRUSES ARE COVERED BY THESE BONDS?

Hint:

URGENT! DEBUNKING THE NEXT ENGINEERED PANDEMIC: HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (NIPAH, MARBURG, EBOLA)

To be continued?
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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

ORDER

When she wasn’t busy selling fresh meat in elite markets, Ghislaine sold weird financial schemes to environmentalist dupes. Here she is trying to do a sale at the 2013 Arctic Circle Assembly, on the same stage as Hillary Clinton and Ban Ki-Moon earlier.

The inaugural Arctic Circle Assembly, October 2013, brought over 1200 participants from more than 35 countries to Reykjavík, making it the largest international gathering on the Arctic. 
The Opening Session program included: Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, Ban Ki-Moon, Alice Rogoff, John Kerry, Hillary Clinton, Aleqa Hammond;  Climate Change: A Plan for Action?; Arctic Ice Melt: Global Weather Events; Arctic Yearbook 2013: The Arctic of Regions vs. The Globalized Arctic

Their list of partners is the most impressive name-dropping you’ve seen in a while, this below is just a figment:

Here’s the impressive organisational structure of the event that invited Ghislaine to propose solutions on their stage:

Chairman

  • Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson

Honorary Board

  • Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson
  • HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco
  • Senator Lisa Murkowski
  • Dr. Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber
  • Artur Chilingarov

Advisory Board

  • Gudmundur Alfredsson, University of Akureyri
  • Alexander Borodin, Iridium Polar Advisory Board
  • Henry Burgess, Natural Environment Research Council, UK
  • Jared Carney, Lightdale, LLC
  • Brynhildur Davíðsdóttir, University of Iceland
  • Milind Deora, former Union Minister of State, Government of India
  • Dana Eidsness, Maine North Atlantic Development Office (MENADO)
  • Jane Francis, British Antarctic Survey
  • Katarina Gårdfeldt, Swedish Polar Research Secretariat
  • James Gray, House of Commons, UK
  • Heidar Mar Gudjonsson, Ursus Investments
  • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Icelandic Centre for Research
  • Lassi Heininen, University of Lapland
  • Paul Holthus, World Ocean Council
  • Kuupik Kleist, Pikialasorsuaq Commission
  • Timo Koivurova, University of Lapland
  • Lars Kullerud, University of the Arctic
  • Jean Lemire, Government of Québec
  • Karin Lochte, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
  • Aleksander Mazharov, Government of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug
  • Scott Minerd, Guggenheim Partners
  • Anders Oskal, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry
  • Frederik Paulsen, Paulsen Editions
  • Maryse Quimper, Société du Plan Nord
  • Volker Rachold, German Arctic Office
  • Carter Roberts, World Wildlife Fund
  • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Arctic Today
  • Peter Seligmann, Nia Tero
  • Hugh Short, Pt Capital
  • Össur Skarphéðinsson, Iceland’s Commission on Greenland
  • Mead Treadwell, Venture Ad Astra
  • Felix Tschudi, Tschudi Shipping Co.
  • Amy L. Wiita, Cinza Research LLC
  • Jan Gunnar-Winther, Norwegian Polar Institute
  • Huigen Yang, Polar Research Institute of China
  • Alex Zhang, Eco Foundation Global
  • Þorsteinn Þorsteinsson, Icelandic Meteorological Office

Because science.

To be continued?
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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

ORDER

Moroccan budget is largely dependent on investors to subsidise its large deficit. Two of its best partners are a couple of banks not quite known in the Western world. Until now.
Bill Gates has his hands deeply in both of them. And this sting is now hurting Morocco and costing it $3Billion a month.
I’m just scratching a surface here, but you can peep in now. Something like this might be happening in your country too.


Completed in my 9th day of hunger strike, under an insane and scientifically unjustified lockdown in Morocco. It was important to publish it now, while I still can, and if my destiny is generous, I will perfect it. The point is made anyway.

I am Gnawi. Everyone living in Morocco outside the Cabal is Gnawi.

UPDATE: On December 22, 2020 this investigative endeavor found its closure and many of the questions I raised found an answer. I added the newest evelopments at the end, but when all this was written I didn’t know what the punchline will be, I only had hunches, so I left the end open.

THE ACTORS

The African Development Bank (ADB / AfDB)

Veteran banking partner of Morocco, The African Development Bank Group or Banque Africaine de Développement is a multilateral development finance institution.
The AfDB was founded in 1964 and comprises three entities:
The African Development Bank, the African Development Fund and the Nigeria Trust Fund. – Wikipedia
CEO: Akinwumi Adesina (Sep 1, 2015–)
Headquarters: Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
Founded: September 10, 1964
Leader: Akinwumi Adesina
Subsidiaries: African Development Fund, Nigeria Trust Fund, and more

“In this first academic study of the ADB, Karen Mingst argues that the bank is a political institution, not the functional, economically neutral organization originally envisioned. Using bank archives and extensive interviews with ADB personnel, contractors, the economic development community, and national government officials, Mingst analyzes the changing political relationships in the ADB in three arenas: intraorganizational politics with effects on the secretariat and on policy issues, political relations with other development organizations, and hegemonic politics among politically and economically powerful state members.”

Amazon Books review of “Politics and the African Development Bank” by Karen A. Mingst

How much African is this African Development Bank?

Not much, by voting powers according to African Development Bank’s own internal documents, as of December 2014.

THERE’S 81 participant countries in total

However, I suspect some big voters are not on that list, are not even countries, but are richer than some countries. Riddle me this…

African Development Bank President Akinwumi Adesina with Bill Gates. Photo by: AfDB

Did you know?
Bill Gates’ fortune in 2017 was roughly equal to Morocco’s GDP.


The Islamic Development Bank (IsDB)

Not a new actor on the local market either, IsDB is a multinational based in Saudi Arabia and it describes itself as “a multilateral development bank (MDB), working to improve the lives of those we serve by promoting social and economic development in Member countries and Muslim communities worldwide, delivering impact at scale.

  • We provide the infrastructure to enable people to lead better lives and achieve their full potential.
  • We bring together 57 member countries across four continents – touching the lives of 1 in 5 of the world’s population.
  • We are one of the world’s most active MDBs, and global leaders in Islamic Finance, with an AAA rating, and operating assets of more than USD 16 billion and subscribed capital of USD 70 billion.
  • We are a truly global institution, headquartered in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, with major hubs in Morocco, Malaysia, Kazakhstan and Senegal, and gateway offices in Egypt, Turkey, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Nigeria.
  • We foster collaboration between our members nations in a uniquely non-political environment, as we focus on the betterment of humanity.

IsDB Official website

IsDB seems to have earned contract after cotract with the government, too many to mention, they’re seriously competing AfDB.
Competing or completing…

Just browsing the multitude of projects IsDB runs in Morocco…

Until 2017, Morocco has received a total of USD 7.6 billion from the Islamic Development Bank (IDB) group since its establishment in 1974, according to Bandar Al-Hajjar, president of the IDB.

You know who else is an even more “fervent” collaborator for IsDB?
I mean so close they should share offices?

Click here to see for yourself


Yeah, Bill Gates, of course.

THE TIMELINE (incomplete)

June 4, 2009

World Bank, the African Development Bank, Gates Foundation, and DEG set up “Health in Africa Fund” under Chinese management

From the official press release: “IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, the African Development Bank, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the German development finance institution DEG – Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH announced June 4, 2009 that they have created a new private equity fund that will invest in Africa’s health sector.

The Health in Africa Fund, managed by Aureos Capital, will invest in small- and medium-sized companies in sub-Saharan Africa, such as health clinics and diagnostic centers, with the goal of helping low-income Africans gain access to affordable, high-quality health services. The fund will be measured not only by fiscal performance but also by its ability to cultivate businesses serving the poor.

The Health in Africa Fund is part of IFC’s Health in Africa Initiative under which IFC intends to mobilize up to $1 billion in investment and advisory services over five years, following publication of its 2007 Business of Health in Africa report, which focuses on how to improve people’s lives by partnering with the private sector. Besides the equity vehicle, IFC is improving access to long-term financing for smaller companies involved in health care through local financial intermediaries. Together with the World Bank and other partners, IFC is working with governments to help them better harness the private sector to achieve national health goals and is producing the first biennial report on Africa’s health care investment climate.

IFC, a member of the World Bank Group creates opportunity for people to escape poverty and improve their lives. We foster sustainable economic growth in developing countries by supporting private sector development, mobilizing private capital, and providing advisory and risk mitigation services to businesses and governments. Our new investments totaled $16.2 billion in fiscal 2008, a 34 percent increase over the previous year.

Guided by the belief that every life has equal value, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation works to help all people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing countries, it focuses on improving people’s health and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty. In the United States, it seeks to ensure that all people—especially those with the fewest resources—have access to the opportunities they need to succeed in school and life. Based in Seattle, Washington, the foundation is led by CEO Jeff Raikes and Co-chair William H. Gates Sr., under the direction of Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett.

DEG, a member of KfW Bankengruppe (KfW banking group), is one of the largest European development finance institutions. DEG invests in profitable projects that contribute to sustainable development in all sectors of the economy, from agribusiness to infrastructure and manufacturing to services. DEG’s aim is to establish and expand private enterprise structures in developing and emerging countries and thus create the basis for sustainable economic growth and a lasting improvement in the living conditions of local populations. In 2008 DEG invested around 1.22 billion euros which is about 1.6 per cent more than the previous year.

  • About Aureos Capital Limited

Aureos Capital Ltd. is a private equity fund management company which specializes in providing expansion and buy-out capital to unlisted small to mid-cap businesses across Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Since its establishment in 2001, Aureos has increased its funds under management to over $1 billion and established 15 regional private equity funds. It has extended its geographical footprint to over 50 emerging markets covering Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Investors in Aureos funds include institutional investors, bilateral and multilateral development finance institutions, pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, fund of funds, family offices and foundations, and high net worth individuals.”

Yeah, but what they don’t tell you…

Aureos Capital is a Chinese fund management firm that provides services across Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Morocco’s capital city Rabat. Photo by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu

2013

The phosphate industry gets some love. But who’s the phosphate industry?

Morocco’s state-run phosphate, OCP Group, (Office Cherifien des Phosphates) has received a $150 million  loan from IsDB to improve its infrastructure and repair facilities at Jorf Lasfar, a deepwater commercial port located on Morocco’s Atlantic coast.
Phosphates are “Morocco’s white gold”, according to Bloomberg, the main natural resource for export in Morocco.
“King Mohammed VI owns more than half the world’s phosphate reserves. James Prokopanko, chief executive officer of Plymouth (Minn.)-based fertilizer giant Mosaic (MOS), has called Morocco the Saudi Arabia of phosphate, with all that implies about the King’s power to influence prices and economies.”

2014

If you want to harvest some billions, you need to seed some millions

According to Morocco World News, in 2014, the IDB amounted to $0.18 billion to Morocco in order to carry out drinking water supply projects in the regions of Agadir and Chtouka Ait Baha, as well as the olive sector for small farmers.

In the same year, oil refiner Samir received a loan of $240 million to finance crude oil imports. Which allegedly refines oil from a company that belongs to the minister of Agriculture, coincidentally Morocco’s richest man, besides the King.
By the way, agriculture loves oil and phosphates.

The IDB has also embarked on signing agreement with partners to invest in Morocco.  In 2014, it signed a joint agreement with Kuwait Investment Authority (KIA) to invest in Moroccan private sectors.

And so forth

February 25, 2015

Moroccan Government employs AfDB to diagnose economy

Working in close collaboration, the Kingdom of Morocco, African Development Bank (AfDB) and the United States Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), have conducted an exhaustive study on constraints and strengths impeding the country’s determination to promote a strong, sustained and shared growth. The study, entitled Morocco’s Economic Growth Analysis: Identifying Constraints to Broad-Based Growth* is derived from in-depth data-driven analysis supported by consultations with all government ministries, private sector, academia and civil society in Morocco. Its objective is to clearly identify constraints to private investment in Morocco and identity priority issues to be addressed in order to grow a strong, dynamic economy.”
This report was officially launched on February 25, 2015 at Rabat Conference Centre. AfDB president Donald Kaberuka participated in the event alongside the Head of the Government of Morocco, Abdelilah Benkirane, and the Ambassador of the United States of America to Morocco, Dwight Bush (a banker as well), among others.

“The 2015 Growth Diagnostic conducted by Morocco, the African Development Bank and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) identified education and certain aspects of the legal framework (taxation, the justice system and land ownership) as major constraints to the development of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The size of the informal economy has also been regularly blamed. The new “self-entrepreneur” status created in 2015 and the gradual extension of social benefits to the self employed should allow some of those operating in the informal economy to move into the formal sector.”, reports African Economic Outlook

Rabat, Morocco. Photo by Silviu Costinescu

March 11, 2015

AfDB Board approves The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Trust Fund

The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 in Abidjan approved the establishment of the Bill and Melinda Gates Trust Fund to be hosted by the Bank.

The Fund’s US $2.4 million initial contribution will support forward-thinking on the issue of concessional finance in development by an African Development Fund (ADF) Policy Lab. It would also support other future Bank activities.

It is the first bilateral fund with a non-sovereign entity, and the first bilateral fund with the Foundation aimed to provide structure to the long-standing collaboration with the Bank and scale up areas of intervention.

The Bank currently manages about 39 trust funds most of which are depleted.

There was overwhelming support for the collaboration, which fits squarely with the Bank’s Ten Year Strategy. The Strategy looks to engage in strategic partnerships to disseminate knowledge and lead new policy initiatives.

The ADF Policy Lab will complement the Mid-Term Review of the ADF, which is the pool of concessional resources dedicated to less endowed Regional Member Countries.

The Bank has been involved in multiple interactions with the Gates Foundation. In 2011, the Foundation contributed US $12 million to the African Water Facility (AWF) to support sanitation services to some of Africa’s urban poor. It also contributed US $15 million towards implementation of the Action Plan for improved statistics for food security in Africa in 2013.

And and then…

March 23, 2015

Bill Gates joins Monsanto in an attempt to take over Africa’s food with GMO’s

If you think Gates has a passion or obsession for medicine, I’m afraid that’s just one of his many tools for control and power grabs. An even more powerful tools in this kit is food, so of course Billy Boi has been long involved in this too.
The other mega-company that shared his views almost in verbatim copy is the infamous Monsanto.
So no one should be surprised that The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation met Monsanto to discuss business behind closed doors in London, in March 2015.
Which event even sparked street protests at the time, the Gates Foundation getting picketed in several locations.

Local TV in Seattle reporting on the Gates Foundation protests

May, 2016

Bill Gates visits Morocco and unveils collaboration with IsDA, becomes news sensation

Gates’ Foundation representatives attended a meeting with the regional head of the Tangier-Tetouan-Al Hoceima region and representatives from the Islamic Development Bank  to discuss Bill Gates’ first visit Morocco in the coming months.

Bill Gates’ trip to Morocco comes after a two-month long effort made by Ilya El Omari, head of the Tangier-Tetouan-Al Hoceima and President of the Party of Authenticity and Modernity (PAM) to convince Microsoft’s founder to visit the North African country. The information was not denied by the PAM.

It seems however, that news, which went viral and was published by most news outlets, including Morocco World News, is not accurate.

According to an email sent by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to Moroccan journalist Anas Bendrif, the “media reports about funding of projects in Morocco are not correct.”

While the Foundation’s did not deny the visit reported by Moroccan media, it pointed out, however, that that no investment is being planned yet in Morocco, adding that any decision in this regard is made by the Islamic Development Bank.

“The Bill and Melinda Gates works with partner organization around the world, including the Islamic Development Bank, to explore new ways of cooperation on initiatives that will help lift the poor out poverty and provide then with brighter future. This includes on-the-ground visits to various communities and regions to learn more about their greatest needs, which may benefit from our joint initiative: the Lives and Livelihoods Fund,” Cecilie, the foundation’s representative said in the email.

“We have no confirmed any projects at his time in Morocco, but we continue to explore potential opportunities wen we will announce those once they materialize.” – Source

January, 2018

Bill Gates Foundation grant for African Development Bank

November 16, 2018

The African Development Bank announces a new initiative to promote innovation and citywide inclusive sanitation services for sub-Saharan Africa’s urban inhabitants. The Bank’s Africa Urban Sanitation Investment Fund Program, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is funding the initiative designed to focus on the poor.

The Gates Foundation, in partnership with the Government of the People’s Republic of China, showcased the new initiative at the Reinvented Toilet Expo in Beijing from 6-8 November 2018. The Reinvented Toilet Expo brought together private and public-sector leaders pushing for faster adoption of innovative, pro-poor sanitation technologies in the world’s developing regions.

“Support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation enhances the Fund’s ability to address sanitation in urban areas for greater outcomes, including in health, nutrition, environment, and employment,” bank officials said.

“The Bill & Melinda Gates Trust Fund funded a study on how to improve connectivity between payment systems and create greater financial inclusion for West Africans, as well as an investment to the Africa Digital Inclusion Fund. Originally $2.4 million, the trust fund now tops $17.9 million due to additional funding by the Gates Foundation.” reports Devex

Meet Rodrigo Salvado

“Before joining the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Rodrigo worked for the African Development Bank Group where he was in charge of the Performance Based Allocation System of the African Development Fund”.
So AfDB is so bad-ass it has people in Gates’ Foundation?!

Salvado holds a Master in Public Administration in International Development from Harvard Kennedy School of Government, a Master in Economics from the Centro de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros in Madrid, and a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella in Argentina.

26 March 2018

AfDB reveals it’s also in cahoots with the Rockefellers and Soros

ABIDJAN — Purse-string tightening by traditional international development donors in recent years has prompted the African Development Bank to cast a wider net in seeking aid funding. One of the areas that has seen success, the bank told Devex, is securing financing from philanthropic organizations.

In February, the Rockefeller Trust Fund provided an initial $3 million to support two of the AfDB’s “High 5” development priorities. The financing will go toward the Leadership for Agriculture Platform — in alignment with the “Feed Africa” pillar — and a youth coding skills training program in connection with the “Improving the Quality of Life for People in Africa” pillar.

The department is currently developing relationships with other socially responsible NGOs including the Ford Foundation and the Open Society Foundations (George Sorors). But Dabady added that the AfDB needs to better communicate the tangible results produced from funding in order to sustain and form partnerships with private foundations.

May 17, 2018

African Development Bank drops 200 million Eu in Morocco’s Agriculture

Rabat – African Development Bank (BAD) has outlined EU 200 million loan dedicated to finance the program of support for the inclusive and sustainable development of agricultural sectors in Morocco.

The new operation aims to support job creation in rural areas through the inclusive development of agricultural value chains, the African bank said in a statement.

The country manager of the BAD in Morocco, Leila Farah Mokaddem, highlighted how the project is projected to boost Morocco’s exports revenues to MAD 45 million by 2030 and save 990 million cubic meters of water. By 2020, it aims to mobilize MAD 4 billion of private investment in the agricultural sector to create thousands of jobs for young people and women in rural areas.

African Development Bank: “Decisive action key to helping African economies during COVID 19”

2019

While Africa still doesn’t have clean water, Gates and AfDB bestow it with “digital financial services”. For the people

In 2019, the Bank partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Government of Luxembourg and Agence Française de Développement to set up the Africa Digital Financial Inclusion Facility (ADFI). ADFI is a blended finance vehicle that aims to scale up digital financial services in Africa to accelerate financial inclusion and ensure that digital financial systems include and empower everyone, especially women.

January 22, 2019

Moroccan Government sign a new agreement for Agenda 2030 implementation

Rabat – “The Moroccan high commissioner for planning (HCP), Ahmed Lahlimi Alami, the deputy resident representative at the UN Development Assistance Framework, Martine Therer, and 10 UN agencies in Morocco signed an agreement in the framework of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)on Tuesday.

During a ceremony at the HCP headquarters in Rabat, the two officials discussed the agreement which is also part of the UNDAF 2017-2021 framework.

The agreement will facilitate the tracking of and reporting of SGD progress in the country to better “inform the policymaker and the public on the progress” of sustainable development in their country.

The agreement is valid for three years and will focus on the following objectives: “The use of performance and statistical data of the Sustainable Development Goals program, the preparation of periodic reports concerning the progress of these goals on national and regional levels, with the help of consultation mechanisms put by the program and through south-south cooperation networks.”

Morocco has made advances in a significant number of SDGs, according to a report by the Economic Commission for Africa released in November.

The report, however, entailed that youth employment, climate change, food security, and industrial transition were some of the complex challenges that Morocco still needs to address.”

Apr 3-6, 2019

Islamic Development Bank holds annual meeting in Morocco, discusses Agenda 2030

The event convenes the bank’s Board of Governors each year to discuss institutional and development issues, pulling in experts and development specialists from around the globe. 2018’s event took place in Tunis.

This year, the meeting’s slogan is “Transformation in a changing world,” a reference to the new development strategy the bank’s president Bandar Hajjar will unveil. The new strategy dovetails with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), according to IsDB.
“Morocco is one of IsDB’s most important partners. The institution has worked extensively with the kingdom, most recently launching a multimillion dollar fund for science and technology in Morocco.” reports local media.

In February, lauding Morocco’s use of private-public partnerships, one of the new “core pillars” of the IsDB, Hajjar called the North African country a “model and a reference” for its other member countries, writes MWN.
Allow me to translate:
Private-public partnerships is code for “siphoning public funds”.
New “core pillars” of the IsDB is code for “Morocco’s budget has become our main provider now”.

Who else loves Agenda 2030 and works to implement it?
If you think Bill Gates, you’re not wrong, but if you think Morocco’s government you’re also right.


But I guess no one loves Agenda 2030 deeper than Israel.

And then Covid-19 hit

March 2020

How do you prevent diseases by detaining big families in tiny rooms ?

May 18, 2020

Economy Minister: Lockdown Costs Morocco MAD 0.1 Billion a Day

Rabat – Morocco’s Minister of Economy, Finance, and Administration Reform, Mohamed Benchaaboun, stated that the country loses up to MAD 1 billion ($100 million) during each day under lockdown, noting it is expected that the two months of quarantine will cause the national economy to lose 6 points of GDP growth for 2020.

“The loss would have been greater if financial support had not been provided by the COVID-19 pandemic management fund, which was created on royal instructions,” explained Benchaaboun in the weekly session dedicated to parliamentary questions on Tuesday.

On the fiscal level, he added that “the economic recession is expected to cause a shortfall in Morocco’s treasury revenues of approximately MAD 500 million per day during the quarantine period.”

Benchaaboun went on to say that Morocco has been largely affected by the repercussions of the health crisis at the economic and financial levels, as shown by a set of economic indicators.

Meanwhile, the small-time local bankers get pushed around by Covid too

Rabat – International ratings agency Fitch Ratings has downgraded three Moroccan banks’ outlooks from “stable” to “negative.”

The study included Attijariwafa Bank (AWB), BMCE Bank of Africa (BOA) and Credit Immobilier et Hotelier (CIH).

The evaluations follow Fitch Ratings’ latest revision of Morocco’s outlook to “negative” from “stable” on April 28, due to the coronavirus crisis.

Fitch Ratings indicated that AWB and BOA are classified as domestic systemically important banks (DSIB) in Morocco, and believes that the government would have a high propensity to support them if needed.

However, the ratings agency classifies the overall probability of Moroccan support as moderate, given the negative repercussions of the pandemic on Morocco’s economy.

Despite Morocco’s proactive response to address the negative shocks of the pandemic, Fitch expects the Moroccan economy to contract 4.5% in 2020. The agency also predicts general government debt to rise to 58% of GDP in 2020 from 52.5% in 2019.

If the projection proves true, it will interrupt 22 successive years of growth – Morocco World News

May 20, 2020

Heavily impacted by the lockdown, a significant number of Moroccan companies have declared bankruptcy

Rabat – Morocco’s Minister of Economy and Finance, Mohamed Benchaaboun, has called on companies to resume their activities after the end of Ramadan, Eid Al Fitr, to revive the lockdown-stressed national economy

The economic resumption concerns companies that have not been prohibited from continuing their activities, and the proposed measure does not include companies that opted for remote work.

Companies excluded from the call are those active in catering services, hotels, and places of gathering.

Benchaaboun made the request during a Parliament session dedicated to the government’s economic and financial measures to mitigate the repercussions of the COVID-19 crisis on Tuesday, May 19.

Seizing the opportunity, Benchaaboun shared with parliamentarians an update on expenses of the Special Fund for the Management and Response to COVID-19. The minister also highlighted measures the government implemented to support companies, employees, and impacted citizens.

He stated that the fund’s revenues reached MAD 32.7 billion ($3.27 billion) as of Monday, May 18. He added that more than MAD 2.2 billion ($220 million) was allocated to upgrade the health sector while a further MAD 11.5 billion ($1.15 billion) was dedicated to the Economic Watch Committee’s (CVE) measures in favor of impacted businesses and employees.

May 27, 2020

COVID-19: African Development Bank Allocates €264 Million to Morocco

If you had enough influence over a cuntry’s rulers to persuade them to implement some suicidal measures, just so you can appear as saviour later, would you do it?
Historically speaking, banksters are usually quite inclined towards such opperations, not t mention Gates.
But I digress, check the latest news:

Rabat – The African Development Bank (AfDB) approved today In Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire the financing of €264 million for Morocco, as part of its COVID-19 response support program (PARC-19).

“With rapid deployment of resources, PARC-19 contributes to bolster the Kingdom’s response efforts to the health, economic and social crisis triggered by the COVID-19 epidemic,” the AfDB said in a press release.

“Faced with this unprecedented situation, we are doing everything in our power to support Morocco to curb the spread of the virus and mitigate its economic and social repercussions,” said AfDB Director General for North Africa, Mohamed El Azizi.

AfDB indicates that protecting the population requires the primary objective of stopping the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The first step also includes improving the effectiveness of the authorities’ response, as well as increasing the number of virological tests.

“The second objective of this operation is intended to help preserve the purchasing power of Moroccans. In this perspective, the program will support public financial support measures, which benefit employees in the formal and informal sectors during the lockdown period,” said the AfDB.

“It will also reinforce [the] government’s efforts to provide support to 4.3 million households in the informal sector as well as 800,000 employees affiliated to the National Social Security Fund (CNSS),” the Bank added.

“Faced with this unprecedented situation, we are doing everything in our power to support Morocco to curb the spread of the virus and mitigate its economic and social repercussions.”

African Development Bank

From the document above, by AfDB:

II.ECONOMIC ANDSOCIAL IMPACT OF COVID-19AND GOVERNANCE

“2.1.Recent Developments:Alongside South Africa, Egypt and Algeria, Morocco is among the African countries with the highest COVID-19 cases. The first case was detected on 2 March 2020 in Casablanca, before spreading to all other regions in the country. On 4May2020, Morocco reported 5,053confirmed COVID-19cases, 179 deaths and 1,653 cured cases. With 1,306 confirmed cases, the Casablanca-Settat region is the most affected region, followed by Marrakech-Safi (1,076 cases), Fès-Meknès (662 cases) and Daraa-Tafilalet (548 cases) (Technical Annex4& 5).
At the onset of the COVID-19pandemic, the Moroccan authorities declared a state of emergency, adopted confinement measures, including isolation, suspended all international passenger flights, prohibited public gatherings and closed all mosques,schools, universities, eateries and cafés. Similarly, they limited urban/inter-urban land transport and downsized Government and corporate staff.
Compulsory confinement, which started on 20 March 2020 and was later extended to 20 May 2020 (and then to 10th of June – writer-s note), has had a significant adverse impact on the national economy.Donors mobilised to support Morocco address the crisis. Under the Precautionary and Liquidity Line (PLL 2018-2020)agreement concluded with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Morocco withdrew all resources under this line, equivalent to USD 3billion.For its part, the World Bank disbursed a loan of USD 275 million.
2.2.Economic Situation:
Like its key trading partners, Morocco’s economy was hard hit by the crisis caused by COVID-19. The tourism sector has lost an estimated MAD 34.1 billion in turnover in 2020, with nearly 6 million fewer tourists,according to the Moroccan Tourism Confederation(CMT). In the automobile sector,the crisis affected the 250 equipment manufacturers operating in the country, leading to a significant drop in
Morocco’s balance of trade. The automobile sector accounted for 27% of total exports in 2019, making itthe leading export sector. In the long run, this might impact the 180,000 jobs in the industry. The textile/dress-making sector is also affected by disruptions in supplies, especially from China and falling foreign demand particularly in the European Union. The textile sector, which employs over 160,000 individuals in 1,200 firms, is threatened.With the double shock of drought and COVID-19, the real GDP growth rate will continue to decelerate in 2020. According to AfDB forecasts(Table 1), it will range from -4.6% to -3.3% in 2020, before rising to between 4.1% and 4.3% in 2021, based on worst-case and best-case scenarios. Various structural and contextual factors will contribute these scenarios. The economy will also suffer from the global recession, particularly in its four key economic partners (Spain, France, Italy and Germany) who make up 76% of its external trade”

The most painful reality here is that most, if not all of this is as legal as obvious. You can watch the money flow, witness the suffering of the people, get enraged, but if the law is your moral compass, nothing happened, move on.

And if anyone ever gets arrested, it’s…

April 2020. Source

updates

May 30, 2020

Test acquisitions are a scandal in Morocco, as everywhere else

Morocco’s Ministry of Health rebutted on May 30 reports claiming a single company with two government contracts worth MAD 400 million ($41 million) is responsible for the procurement of COVID-19 rapid diagnostic tests.

The ministry said it signed a contract for two million rapid diagnostic tests worth MAD 212 million ($21.7 million) that did not entirely cover Morocco’s needs, according to the press release.

The agreement was in accordance with health emergency laws and in full compliance with the principle of competitive contracting, the health ministry explained.

The statement added that the ministry consulted “world-leading” companies in the field to ensure technical and financial evaluation of the offers.

The acquired tests are technically efficient and compatible with national laboratories’ equipment, rendering the purchase and cost of new screening equipment unnecessary, the statement continued. 

The Ministry of Health said it benchmarked Morocco’s contract to those of other countries, with the statement explaining, “It is the same price paid by several European and Asian countries for the acquisition of quantities ranging from 6 to 10 million tests.”

The ministry affirmed that it “ensures exemplary application of all legal provisions in order to properly manage the resources placed at its disposal.”

The news comes amid Morocco’s efforts to curtail the spread of misinformation during the COVID-19 crisis.

In March, the Director of Epidemiology at the Ministry of Health, Mohamed Lyoubi, had to deny reports that Morocco purchased 100,000 COVID-19 test kits from a South Korean manufacturer. Basically accusing South Korean media and manufacturers of spreading fake news.

“Since the start of the outbreak in the country, Moroccan laboratories have conducted more than 200,000 tests on suspected carriers, of which 197,805 came back negative”, officials claim.

What Moroccan Government and most world governments have never done since the beginning of the crisis:
1. A risks & costs assessment of their Covid policies, prior to enactment
2. A side-effects assessment of of their Covid policies, post enactment
3. Transparent acquisitions

What did they all do?


Control of media narrative, repression of unaligned speech.

Morocco arrested an old woman for spreading panic by saying there’s no reason to panic. Among other dissenters. And this is the logic of all restrictive Covid-19 policies

Source

Mi Naima literally said in a censored video “don’t be alarmed by the government and media, Coronavirus is a farce”.
“Fake news is the first cause of panic among citizens,” said Prime Minister Saad Eddine El-Otmai, in a press conference after Mi Naima’s arrest, comparing the spread of misinformation with the contagion of the disease.

Other people were arrested for opposing strict measures against public gathering, urging people to ignore them, or saying a lockdown had been implemented when it had not.

On the same day, the government approved a draft law governing the use of social media, aiming to deter fake news and cyber crimes undermining public order and the economy.

Rights groups have criticised Morocco for what they see as an increasing crackdown on free speech over the past year, including prison terms for people who have expressed dissent on social media, reports Reuters

Guess which is the only Moroccan business unaffected by Covid

Source

If you paid attention, you guessed right: It’s the Royal phosphate business.
QED.

“With the exception of Morocco’s stable phosphates sales, the country’s major export sectors have suffered from the fall in world demand, the breakdown of supply chains, and the disruption of several activities in Morocco, all consequences of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Morocco’s automobile exports fell by 39% at the end of April, textiles by 28%, aeronautics by 34%, and foodstuffs by 7%.

The losses range from MAD 1.8 billion to MAD 11 billion ($184 million to $1.1 billion).” – reports Morocco World News.

To be continued?

Probably so. I leave you with a mystery: How come Moroccan government approved a famous international Israeli spy and child trafficker like Epstein to land his jet (aka “Lolita Express”) on their airports? Official flight registries and press reports show that it happened at least twice.
Seeing that Gates and Epstein were partners, did they use Morocco as a secret meeting ground?

We know for sure Morocco was a generous host to other usurpers:

Meet Carlos Moreira

FOLLOW UPS
It has all come together, finally:

2018: Donald Trump stares at King “Pfizer I” of Morocco falling asleep during Armistice event.
To the right side of the Moroccan dictator is his son, literally the richest kid in the world.
Below is what followed, and not what you’d expect after this video.
How Kushner’s Sephardic Jews started to leverage Trump in Morocco as he thought he’ll become an international geopolitics leader
Rabbi Chaim Pinto Hagadol Zatsal. Rabbi Haim Pinto the Great was born in Agadir, Morocco on Tammuz 15, 5509 (July 1, 1749), on the Hilloula of Rabbi Haim Ben Attar. He was the son of the saintly and venerated Rabbi Shlomo Pinto Zatzal, the descendant of Rabbi Yoshiyahu Pinto, known by the name of the Rif of Ein Yaakov.
“Morocco made my Judaism better”

To be continued?
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I’ve shown you in my previous articles that the weather and the climate are cash-cows for the financial elites regardless of whether they cool down or heat up. And you thought pandemics are anything less? I’m afraid not….

On June 28, 2017, The World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development) launched specialized bonds aimed at providing financial support to the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF), a facility created by the World Bank to channel surge funding to developing countries facing the risk of a pandemic.

“This marks the first time that World Bank bonds are being used to finance efforts against infectious diseases, and the first time that pandemic risk in low-income countries is being transferred to the financial markets.”

The World Bank – June 28, 2017

Going through the IMF/IBRD official press-release published with the launch of this financial “A-Team”, it didn’t take long to spot something very interesting:

Source

 World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said. “We are moving away from the cycle of panic and neglect that has characterized so much of our approach to pandemics. We are leveraging our capital market expertise, our deep understanding of the health sector, our experience overcoming development challenges, and our strong relationships with donors and the insurance industry to serve the world’s poorest people. This creates an entirely new market for pandemic risk insurance. Drawing on lessons from the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa, the Facility will help improve health security for everyone. I especially want to thank the World Health Organization and the governments of Japan and Germany for their support in launching this new mechanism.”

The World Bank announced the creation of the PEF in May 2016 at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Governors meeting in Sendai, Japan. The PEF will quickly channel funding to countries facing a major disease outbreak with pandemic potential. “Its unique financing structure combines funding from the bonds issued today with over-the-counter derivatives that transfer pandemic outbreak risk to derivative counterparties. The structure was designed to attract a wider, more diverse set of investors.”

According to The World Bank, the PEF has two windows. The first is an ‘insurance’ window with premiums funded by Japan and Germany, consisting of bonds and swaps including those executed today. The second is a ‘cash’ window, for which Germany provided initial funding of Euro 50 million. The cash window will be available from 2018 for the containment of diseases that may not be eligible for funding under the insurance window.

The bonds and derivatives for the PEF’s ‘insurance’ window were developed by the World Bank Treasury in cooperation with leading reinsurance companies Swiss Re and Munich Re. AIR Worldwide was the sole modeler, using the AIR Pandemic Model to provide expert risk analysis. Swiss Re Capital Markets is the sole book runner for the transaction. Swiss Re Capital Markets and Munich Re are the joint structuring agents. Munich Re and GC Securities, a division of MMC Securities LLC are co-managers.

Swiss Re Capital Markets Limited, Munich Re and GC Securities were also joint arrangers on the derivatives transactions.

The bonds will be issued under IBRD’s “capital at risk” program because investors bear the risk of losing part or all of their investment in the bond if an epidemic event triggers pay-outs to eligible countries covered under the PEF.

The PEF covers six viruses that are most likely to cause a pandemic. These include new Orthomyxoviruses (new influenza pandemic virus A), Coronaviridae (SARS, MERS), Filoviridae (Ebola, Marburg) and other zoonotic diseases (Crimean Congo, Rift Valley, Lassa fever).

PEF financing to eligible countries will be triggered when an outbreak reaches predetermined levels of contagion, including number of deaths; the speed of the spread of the disease; and whether the disease crosses international borders. The determinations for the trigger are made based on publicly available data as reported by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Countries eligible for financing under the PEF’s insurance window are members of the International Development Association (IDA), the institution of the World Bank Group that provides concessional finance for the world’s poorest countries. The PEF will be governed by a Steering Body, whose voting members include Japan and Germany. WHO and the World Bank serve as non-voting members.

In the past ten years, The World Bank brags about having has executed close to $2 billion in catastrophe risk transactions.

UPDATE: There’s more to it!

FINANCIAL VACCINES: “OBSCENE” PANDEMIC INSURANCE BONDS ISSUED SINCE 2017 BY WORLD BANK AND WHO, WITH NO INTENT TO PAY OR HELP

To be continued?
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Did you know there’s a weather casino on the global market and each weather report enriches some douchebags? Wouldn’t that incentivize the said douchebags to rig the casino, let’s say through geoengineering, insider info, or simply by faking the reports?


HERE’S HOW YOU CAN BET ON WEATHER AND TEMPERATURES

” Weather derivatives are financial products that are closely linked to weather conditions. This product was created with the aim of reducing the variability of margins due to adverse weather events. Weather derivatives are customizable products: for example, if the temperature recorded in Milan in the winter period negatively affects revenues, through weather derivatives conditions can be managed more efficiently and risks reduced. Moreover, unlike other products, this solution allows to have a clear knowledge of economic exposure: the occurrence of certain weather conditions leads to a cash flow defined previously and limited to a maximum and a minimum. Weather derivatives, with a lower expenditure compared to traditional solutions, allow to protect oneself from risks that cannot be managed with other products.” This is how sellers like Enel advertise for their products. As always, the advertising is false.
If the dealers’ claims were true, the main outcome of this business would be protection and the main beneficiary would be agriculture. The reality sits at the opposite pole of the spectrum: agriculture is one of the least involved in this market, and the main application for this instrument has been financial speculation and gain for the traders.
Speculative trading is also encouraged by the main difference between insurances and weather derivatives: it’s not damage that requires retribution, but unforeseen weather developments. Like a spike in temperatures or a hurricane. Well, hurricanes not so much, since Sandy, they dumped products covering for such events and now it’s almost entirely a temperature-based casino.

“Since the contract is index-based, buyers of weather derivatives do not need to demonstrate a loss. In order to collect insurance, on the other hand, damage must be shown.”

Investopedia

JOIN THE DOTS: WEATHER MANIPULATION + WEATHER BETS = ?

Weather modification and meteorological warfare have been a preoccupation for governments around the world since quite a while now, there’s recorded meetings of the US Congress debating these topics since 1950’s. But recently it’s become a private business too. You can even buy the perfect weather for your wedding nowadays. I also know directly from the crew that worked on the Cold Mountain movie that they had weather modification on emergency call because they were losing production money waiting for a rain that was predicted by meteorologists and never came naturally.
So the question in the headline above is a no-brainer, I’m not going to insult your intelligence by answering it.
Instead I’m going to quote an witty anonymous comment on Internet:

“So all we have to do is check the CME on weather derivatives to see if there is a spike in purchases & we’ll know if we have a major weather event about to happen?”

IT GETS BETTER… I MEAN WORSE!

There’s a video below with a muppet “expert” from the weather casino claiming you can’t abuse the system with “superior information” because meteorologists can only predict accurately a few weeks ahead. Right. I thought we have computer models that tell us beyond any doubt what’s up in 2030 and we only have 18 months to live on the planet due to Global Warming, blah blah… Is that BS then? If so, no probs buddy, that’s not the only way to predict things, best way is to fulfill your own prophecies. As suggested above. And you can get help from your partners in politics.
Barack Obama announced in 2013 that he had signed S. 716, which repealed a requirement of the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge (STOCK) Act requiring high-ranking federal employees to disclose their financial information online.
“Versions of the STOCK Act had been introduced for several years, but it was fast-tracked at the Capitol following media reports that suggested members of Congress might have profited from private information obtained during their legislative work. Members singled out in the reports maintained their innocence, but the spotlight spurred quick action on enacting legislation emphasizing that members of Congress be subject to insider trading laws among their disclosure enhancements”, according to media reports.
So if you have access to intelligence on weather manipulation and geophysical warfare, as conducted by your own government, you’re in for a new nice villa on some tropical island. And that won’t be unprecedented.

WE HAVE THE MOTIVES, THE WEAPONS AND THE SUSPECTS. HOW BIG IS THE HEIST?



The expert in the video below says that no less than 1/3 of the US GDP is weather dependent. I say pretty much every walk of life is weather-dependent and I got back-up:

Weather is not just an environmental issue, it is a major economic factor. At least $1 trillion of our economy is weather-sensitive.

Investopedia

“Weather conditions tend to affect volume and usage more than they directly affect the price. An exceptionally warm winter, for example, can leave utility and energy companies with excess supplies of oil or natural gas (because people need less to heat their homes). Or an exceptionally cold summer can leave hotel and airline seats empty. Although the prices may change somewhat as a consequence of unusually high or low demand, price adjustments don’t necessarily compensate for lost revenues resulting from unseasonable temperatures” – from the same Investopedia article.
Bottom line: weather is business and the sky is no limit to how much money you can make.

Don Cyr, Associate Professor of Finance & Dean, Goodman School of Business, Brock University, looks at the use of weather derivatives in managing weather related risks tied to Hurricane Sandy. Video by: Business News Network Original video has been removed from the internet

To be continued?
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