My guts are smarter than my brains, but the brains are catching up. And they do it faster when James Corbett helps out

From the very beginning of the Ukraine conflict I maintained skepticism for the narrative from both sides, as you should, but I had difficulties deciding to which extent they are BS.

Putin was full in, I bet he wants full out now, in terms of public image

Basically, my main and only dilemma was:
Did Putin enter the Ukraine stage willingly, as an actor, following the globalist script, as he always does, or was he baited and trapped in to be sacrificed on the altar of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the GloboPedoDiversity, and now he’s really threatened existentially and fighting for survival?

DARPA invests millions in emotion-predictive AIs. Which help with riot predictions

I brought up a bunch of reasons to explain how I got to this point and why I am more inclined to believe this is all a shitshow just like the empty hospitals during the hospital overrun of 2020, or Chinese people dropping dead on the streets of Beijing “becuz Covid maaaan”.

One of my first indicators was that the script is very obsolete, old-school kinetic take over for people who are still engaging with post-WW2 propaganda movies, such as most of elder audiences in Russia and a good chunk of the American ones. This corroborates with the backwards scrap arsenal Putin sent there, probably because it was more cheap and ecological to dump them in Ukraine than at home. If you think that’s where the military is right now, as we discuss graphene oxide and transhumanism, if you think it takes more than an afternoon for a power like Russia to take over a town like Mariupol, you’re at least 50 years behind the technological curve and that’s more than all the technological progress mankind has made in its entire prior history.

Second major red flag: Russia is underplaying every hand, from propaganda to military. I’ve never seen the much feared “Russian spies”, “Russian bots” and “Russian hackers” more inhibited in my life, same as RT and other means of influence they have. Their intel nukes can implode the establishment instantly, rest assured they were among the first to get Biden’s laptops content.

GHISLAINE’S FATHER PIMPED EPSTEIN AND WHORED FOR KGB. PUTIN’S INTELLIGENCE ARSENAL MORE DEVASTATING FOR ELITES THAN NUKES

Funny how the people demanding to be followed are always behind me.
NEWSWEEK

Even the biolabs thing looks like they rather want to discredit it providing those thin files of evidences as we, independent media, made a stronger case for them than they did. This is not lazy, this is borderline sabotage.

THE BIOLABS, CHERNOBYL AND FUKUSHIMA HAVE SURPRISING THINGS IN COMMON AND THEY ARE HARDLY ACCIDENTAL

Thirdly: Putin has been working on the edifice of the New Normal for decades, you don’t exit or get “exited” just like that from a lifetime legacy.

Putin to Schwab: “We go as far back as 1992”
Davos 2021 setting up the narrative for next year?

THIS 2012 AD FOR THE RUSSIAN VERSION OF THE GREAT RESET SOUNDED NUTS THEN BUT WILL GIVE YOU CHILLS NOW

Kissinger is Klaus Schwab’s Harvard teacher and Trump’s former advisor.
He taught Mao’s work at Harvard.

BETWEEN HYSTERICALS ABOUT RUSSIAN HACKERS, WEF MEMBERS GATHER UNDER RUSSIAN HELMS TO WORK ON THE CYBER GREAT RESET

Putin @ Davos 2021: “‘The world risks sliding into an “all against all” conflict’. Because Covid.

#4: The Ukraine camp is a huge “unholy alliance” fueled by Chabad Lubavitch money and influence.

NATO, NAZIS & AL-QAEDA IN THE SAME BOAT – WE’RE THERE

ABSOLUTE MUST SEE RESOURCES ON UKRAINE

No one is closer to Chabad than Putin, only Trump rivals.

‘Starting in 1999, Putin enlisted two of his closest confidants, the oligarchs Lev Leviev and Roman Abramovich, who would go on to become Chabad’s biggest patrons worldwide, to create the Federation of Jewish Communities of Russia under the leadership of Chabad rabbi Berel Lazar, who would come to be known as “Putin’s rabbi.”
A few years later, Trump would seek out Russian projects and capital by joining forces with a partnership called Bayrock-Sapir, led by Soviet emigres Tevfik Arif, Felix Sater and Tamir Sapir—who maintain close ties to Chabad. The company’s ventures would lead to multiple lawsuits alleging fraud and a criminal investigation of a condo project in Manhattan.’

POLITICO

So why wouldn’t the alliance encompass Putin too, as the bad cop in the movie where leftoids play the good cop?

Fifth, but not last, the Western response to the crisis aligns more with the Covid agenda, WEF agenda and Agenda2030 than with a peace plan. They’re using the same scripts with new faces, like a gender-swapped Hollywood remake of a classic movie.

Romanian communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu came up with an even brighter idea: Alternately, one weekend was free for drivers who had even numbers on their registration plates, next weekend the uneven number took over. We actually hardly had any cars and car pollution, only industrial pollution. But he was exporting all reserves to raise money and pay out our debt to the Rothschilds. He achieved his goal with incredible sacrifices and hardships from the population, in the summer of 1989. They executed him on Christmas day same year, during the “anti-communist revolution”, in fact the first televised coup by the West (NATO and the likes of).

I could go on and make a long and detailed list, but this more than suffices to make the case.

It’s almost like Russia doesn’t want to win in Ukraine, but to linger there as long as possible, and maintain international tension without investing more than a few slaves and some scrapyard junk.

However, I was missing the weight that decisively inclines the balance either way, and I kept telling people I’m waiting for more intel before I make a definitive call.

Three weeks in, and the level of silliness in the media reports and Internet debates made my brains bleed through my eyes really badly. My skeptical inclinations inclined even more. Still no closure to the internal hesitations though.

SOME HIGHLIGHTS TO RECAP:

SCREENSHOT SOURCE

And then, just the other day, all of a sudden, Mr. James Corbett dropped the mic on this and definitively closed the internal debate for me.
I hope he will provide you with the same sense of closure and mental relief! Watch it entirely, please, no skipping, even if it seems to be off-topic in the beginning, this is masterfully built and eloquently laid out, as Corbett does, but if you try taking shortcuts you will only shortcut yourself. I don’t want to oversell it, but this will be one of the best-invested hours of your life, in 2022.

CLICK HERE FOR CORBETT’S SHOW NOTES AND RESOURCES!

As per usual, Corbett doesn’t need my help in in making a full, eloquent and clear case, but I will add here, over time, more information, resources and comments that corroborate and further our understanding of this psyop.

One single comment: The Young Global Leaders history is much older, the program has been built on the shoulders of other previous attempts to create a dictator incubator.

KLAUS SCHWAB’S YOUTH IS CALLED “YOUNG GLOBAL LEADERS”, READY FOR REGIME CHANGE IN UNALIGNED COUNTRIES

Talking about YGL…

Modi: “Post World-Wars, the entire world worked on a New World Order. We need to do it again”

BONUS RESOURCES:

Below I will add other resources that corroborate with this story or enrich our context and perspective on it.

Aleksandr Dugin – “Putin is Liberal Democrat, Globalist almost”
Good Cop / Bad Cop

In the video below, please replace “Covid” with “Ukraine” and tell me what’s the difference?

Covid is a psyop – Russian Colonel of Military Intelligence and Spetsnaz (Special Forces) , May 2020

CHINESE COMMUNISM IS AS JEWISH AS ITS RUSSIAN COUSIN (YOUTUBE BAN WINNER)

WAR ON PRIVILEGE WAS THE CORE THEME OF THE COMMUNIST PROPAGANDA IN MY HOME COUNTRY AND ALL SOVIET BLOCK

THREE WEEKS LATER…

The international peasantry are just collaterals to Biden’s “preventative informational warfare”.

Three U.S. intel officials admit the W.H. practices disinfo ‘to mess with Putin’s head’ – NBC
“Can we really let Putin BACK into the New World Order?”
How the Ukraine conflict fuels the communist NWO – John Birch Society

To be continued?
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ORDER

If you think the headline is hyperbolic, I’m just closely paraphrasing the esteemed professor at the Tel-Aviv University, Yuval Harari.

I guess this should be the 6th instalment of the Biohacking series…

This video could also serve as trailer for these exposes:

VACCINES AS GATEWAY TO DIGITAL ID, A CONCEPT LAUNCHED IN 2016, AT DAVOS, BY GATES AND PHARMAFIA

THE INTERNET OF BODIES AKA THE BORG IS HERE, KLAUS SCHWAB SAYS (BIOHACKING P.5)

This is where we are at the time I’m putting this together”

IRS Will Soon Require Biometric Data from Taxpayers

 Western Journal  January 20, 2022

Hundreds of years after a minor increase in the duties paid on tea goaded American farmers and craftsmen to take on the greatest empire in the world, these colonials’ descendants are being told to hand over something much more personal than money.

In addition to the taxes expected to be handed over and responsibly spent by the government, the Internal Revenue Service will soon require Americans to submit biometric data to access their accounts.

Starting this summer, creating an account on the IRS website will require a photo of your government identification as well as a video for facial recognition purposes to be submitted to a third-party company.

According to CNBC, an account with the government contractor, ID.me, will not be required to pay taxes.

“The IRS emphasizes taxpayers can pay or file their taxes without submitting a selfie or other information to a third-party identity verification company,” the agency said in a statement.Trending:Update: FBI Raids COVID Testing Company Accused of Falsifyng Test Results in $124 Million Cover-Up

“Tax payments can be made from a bank account, by credit card or by other means without the use of facial recognition technology or registering for an account.”

Don’t run to thank the taxman yet — your personal biometrics must be handed over to access functions on the IRS website. Without this access, taxpayers may not be able to see their tax transcripts or check on payment agreements.

Even applying for a payment plan, creating a security PIN and viewing stimulus check status will be impossible without the personal data.

If this unsettles you, it gets worse.

The government’s need to know everything about you, down to the minor contours of your face, isn’t going away any time soon, it seems.Will you submit biometric data to the IRS?Yes No
 Completing this poll entitles you to The Western Journal news updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Taxpayers and others are being warned to create an account soon. The service is expected to grow and become a requirement for many other applications.

Unfortunately, a government contract and no competition do not appear to be the best incubator for a quality product. Major problems have already been reported with the system that could seriously hurt people’s finances.

Many have faced issues getting their identity verified. Some have had to wait for months while verification takes place.

While waiting for this to happen, services like unemployment payments are not provided to the person entitled to them.Related:IRS Now Acting Like the Mafia with Message Specifically for Thieves and Looters

The company asserts that there are remedies for these problems, including video calls with “trusted referees,” employees able to connect with citizens to work out issues.

Regardless of any issues, it looks like this verification system will only become a more integral part of the government and force ordinary people to go above and beyond to prove their identity.

And another sign of the now times:

Let’s roll back down the history lane

2018-2021

Exposing Idemia: The Push For National Biometric IDs In America

Idemia, the focus of this report, is not a household name, despite its reach into the private and commercial affairs of most Americans. The company’s advance of biometric data strategies, databases and scanning devices for access and entry control—“augmented identification”—are also likely unknown. However, this global company is acquainted with most American citizens, whose private information flows through its equipment, databases, and software products. That said, it is unclear whether Idemia actually stores this data long-term. One news article on TSA PreCheck, the program that speeds clearance at airport security, says the data and fingerprints of program applicants are not stored by Idemia. The company simply collects them for the program and sends them to the FBI, which destroys them or sends them back.

This report seeks to acquaint Americans and their elected representatives with Idemia and biometric ID cards—and draw attention to our organization’s concern that current or future augmented identification requirements could negatively impact individual freedom and patient access to medical services.

In addition, as we often say, “He who holds the data makes the rules.” Third parties that collect, store or have the power to access personal data on Americans without their consent also have the power to use that data to interfere in the personal lives and private choices of individuals. This report will add weight to that reality

INTRODUCING IDEMIA & BIOMETRICS

Imagine sitting at a bank applying for a credit card and waving your hand through a scanner, allowing the bank to capture a biometric scan. Or imagine being required to scan your fingerprint to use that card for payment. Picture your identification documents being stored on your mobile or digital devices and being unlocked with a biometric face scan, similar to how Face ID,

Apple’s new technology, unlocks iPhones.4 Visualize walking through an airport and having scanners capture your facial, iris, and fingerprint biometrics as you go through each phase of security or reach your gate. Pick out a rental car online and imagine using your biometric ID to unlock and operate the car instead of a key.

Idemia, which calls itself “the global leader in trusted identities,” has imagined it already. These augmented identification systems using individual biometrics for entry, access and commercial transactions are portrayed in a video found on Idemia’s website, and available on YouTube.5 The company considers itself “the world number one” in the biometric algorithm and sensor technology market.

Exposing Idemia: The Push For National Biometric IDs In America

PANdemia or IDemia?
The answer is in your face!

2018

2017

The Biometric ID Grid: A Country-by-Country Guide

Corbett • 01/31/2017 

In last week’s report on India’s demonetization disaster I began to connect the dots between demonetization, the push for a cashless society, and the biometric identification schemes that will eventually tie everyone’s fingerprints, iris scans, and other identifying details to every transaction they ever make.

Well, that game of “connect the dots” just became even easier to play.

First, it was reported last week that a key panel advising the government on its implementation of the “digital payments ecosystem” (that is being pushed and funded by USAID) is now recommending that India links its national biometric ID database directly to tax returns.

And now comes word that India is “working on a biometrics-backed payment system that will be connected to a user’s unique ID number, or Aadhaar.” (Who could have seen that coming?)

No, it doesn’t take a Nostradamus to understand where this is all heading: From the cashless society and the biometric ID grid to the cashless biometric grid. And we already know about the cashless society. Now it’s time to collect the data on the biometric ID grid.

And let’s not be naive: As I’ve demonstrated before, this is a coordinated plan to institute a worldwide biometric id system to track every human on the planet.

But given how fast and furious these new biometric databases are coming online, no one person can possibly keep track of them all. That’s why I’m calling on Corbett Report members to help assemble this information. Like last year’s open source investigation into the War on Cash, this country-by-country guide will be updated with input from the Corbett Report community. Members of the site are invited to log in and leave links to information about the biometric ID grid in their country in the comments section below.

The Biometric ID List

Afghanistan – In 2016 the US bragged about their role in helping the Afghan Ministries of Defense and Interior roll out biometric ID systems for their workers. Also in 2016 the Afghanistan Telecom Regulatory Authority revealed that they wanted to “start linking biometrics to new SIM card registrations, to improve national security.” As has been widely reported, the US military has been waging “biometric warfare” in the country as part of its invasion, occupation and (de)stabilization effort since at least 2010. The Afghanistan National Security Forces has now deployed their own Automated Biometric Information System with fingerprint, iris, and facial scan capabilities and is “compatible with the U.S. DoD ABIS and the FBI Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.”

Australia – Australia has been issuing biometric passports since 2005 and the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) has been running biometrics collection centres for years to issue visas tied to visitors’ biometric details. But now, Australia is about to lead us into a Brave New World with a world first: The DIBP is going to introduce the first “self-processing system” for travelers at Australian airports later this year using biometric details instead of a passport. Australian schools have implemented fingerprint scans as a method of tracking attendance at schools despite a strong backlash from parents that led to similar programs being suspended in the past.

Bolivia – In 2009 Bolivia’s elections were held using an electoral voter list created by using biometric data. In 2016 the Bolivian government began a 12-month program to perform a biometric census on the country’s foreign population.

Bulgaria – Bulgaria began issuing biometric identity cards (mandatory for all citizens) in March 2010. Bulgaria also issues biometric passports and driver’s licenses containing embedded biometric data.

Brazil – Brazil began issuing biometric identity cards in 2011 with the intention of issuing cards as part of its Registro de Identidade Civil, which intends to capture the biometric details of all 150 million citizens by 2020. Also in 2011 the Brazilian Electoral Justice approved the roll out of a biometric voter registration system that requires voters to register their fingerprints in order to vote (which is mandatory).

Canada – Under NEXUS, the joint Canada-US “preferred traveler” program, iris scans are used to identify passengers. In 2015 the Canadian government expanded biometric screening, including fingerprints and digital photos, to visitors from all 151 visa-required countries.

Chile – In 2013 Chile rolled out its new national ID and passport infrastructure including an eID card which “is based on a multi-biometric system comprised of an Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and a Facial Recognition System.” The country aims to issue all of its 18+ million citizens with a card by 2022.

China – In 2016 China debuted its first airport biometric entry system. The system takes travelers’ photos at security checkpoints within the airport, linking their faces to their boarding passes. In 2017, the Chinese government unveiled new biometric travel passes (including fingerprint scans) for mainland visitors to Taiwan.

Finland – Finland introduced biometric residence permit cards in 2012. The cards include a chip that stores a digital photograph and two fingerprints.

France – France has issued only biometric passports since 2009. The passport requires the collection of a biometric digital photo and eight fingerprints.

Germany – Germany introduced biometric passports in 2005 and biometric residence permits in 2011, both of which require a biometric digital photograph and two fingerprints to be collected and stored on an embedded chip. Germany’s identity card does require a biometric photo, but so far fingerprint collection is optional.

Greece – In compliance with the dictates of Washington, the Greek government is set to issue new biometric IDs this year. As Greek Report notes: “Failure to create the new IDs in a timely manner could lead to a suspension in the visa-free travel to the US that Greeks currently enjoy.”

India – India has been fingerprinting and iris scanning its population for years in its quest to construct the largest biometric ID database in the world. The plan to collect and store biometric details on all 1.2 billion Indian citizens is proceeding apace, and has so far registered over 1.1 billion people, including over 99% of all Indians over 18.

Israel – In 2009 the Knesset enacted the controversial Biometric Database Law to pave the way for the implementation of a national biometric ID database. Last July it was reported that the “pilot program” had come to an end and all Israeli residents would be forced to register their biometric details with the government. In December it was announced that the mandatory implementation of the database was being delayed and that fingerprints may no longer be required.

Japan – In 2007 the Japanese government began requiring fingerprints and digital photographs from all foreign travelers. Now, the government is considering implementing a biometric ID payment system which will “allow” (sic) tourists to “register their fingerprints or finger vein patterns among other personal information with the service and then deposit a set amount of money in a connected account,” from which they can make purchases while in the country.

Mexico – In 2011 the Mexican government began a program to issue biometric identification cards to all children between 4 and 17 years old. The cards contain a digital photograph, a fingerprint and an iris scan. The scheme is part of a broader National Population Register that will eventually extend to adults and contain the biometric details of the entire population of Mexico.

Netherlands – Since 2009 the Netherlands has issued biometric passports containing an embedded chip with a digital photograph and fingerprints. Four Dutch citizens challenged the legality of the practice of collecting fingerprints but it was approved by the European Court of Justice. Although only two fingerprints are stored on the passport’s chip, four fingerprints are taken and stored by the local government in a central database that is also used to pursue criminal investigations.

New Zealand – New Zealand’s Inland Revenue Department rolled out “Voice ID” in 2011 to register “customers'” voice prints and identify them in future interactions. By 2015 1.4 million of the country’s 6.1 million taxpayers had registered their voice prints with the “service.”

Saudi Arabia – In 2015 Saudi Arabia finalized its Automated Central System to collect and store the biometric details (including fingerprints) of all citizens and expatriates. Also in 2015 the country’s biometric border security system was launched.

South Korea – In 2012 the Korean government began collecting fingerprints and digital photographs of all foreign visitors (except foreign government officials/international organization representatives and their accompanying immediate family members as well as persons under 17 years of age).

Switzerland – Switzerland launched its biometric passport in 2010 after a referendum was held to approve the measure. The referendum passed with 50.14% of the vote, making it one of the closest referendums in Swiss history. The passports adopt the “international standard” of collecting two fingerprints (one from each index finger) and a digital photograph of the holder’s unsmiling face.

Ukraine – A law passed by the Yanukovych government in 2012 requires all Ukrainian citizens, regardless of age, to obtain a biometric passport.

United Kingdom – The UK under the Labour government of Tony Blair and later Gordon Brown attempted to implement a national identity register and ID card system that would have required the logging of an extensive amount of personal and biometric information in a central database. However, the program caused waves of protest and the government eventually gave in to the public outcry, scrapping the plan for the national registry and instead only implementing the biometric id scheme for foreign nationals. The UK does issue biometric passports and recent polling suggests UK adults “are now willing to embrace biometric identity for online banking.”

United States – President Trump’s new Executive Order on “terrorist” (sic) entry calls on the Department of Homeland Security to “expedite the completion and implementation of a biometric entry-exit tracking system for all travelers to the United States.” (This comes as no surprise to those who warned that Trump’s transition team was swarming with biometric industry workers and lobbyists.) The United States already takes digital fingerprints of all foreign tourists (except Canadians) and stores them in a database for 75 years.  The DoD has announced plans to replace Common Access Card access to information systems with biometric authentication. The US issues biometric passports and coordinates with the Canadian government on the biometric NEXUS preferred traveler program (see Canada).

2014

Biometric Security Poses Huge Privacy Risks

Scientific American. January 1, 2014

Without explicit safeguards, your personal biometric data are destined for a government database

Security through biology is an enticing idea. Since 2011, police departments across the U.S. have been scanning biometric data in the field using devices such as the Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System (MORIS), an iPhone attachment that checks fingerprints and iris scans. The fbi is currently building its Next Generation Identification database, which will contain fingerprints, palm prints, iris scans, voice data and photographs of faces. Before long, even your cell phone will be secured by information that resides in a distant biometric database.

Unfortunately, this shift to biometric-enabled security creates profound threats to commonly accepted notions of privacy and security. It makes possible privacy violations that would make the National Security Agency’s data sweeps seem superficial by comparison.

Biometrics could turn existing surveillance systems into something categorically new—something more powerful and much more invasive. Consider the so-called Domain Awareness System, a network of 3,000 surveillance cameras in New York City. Currently if someone commits a crime, cops can go back and review sections of video. Equip the system with facial-recognition technology, however, and the people behind the controls can actively track you throughout your daily life. “A person who lives and works in lower Manhattan would be under constant surveillance,” says Jennifer Lynch, an attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit group. Face-in-a-crowd detection is a formidable technical problem, but researchers working on projects such as the Department of Homeland Security’s Biometric Optical Surveillance System (BOSS) are making rapid progress.

In addition, once your face, iris or DNA profile becomes a digital file, that file will be difficult to protect. As the recent nsa revelations have made clear, the boundary between commercial and government data is porous at best. Biometric identifiers could also be stolen. It’s easy to replace a swiped credit card, but good luck changing the patterns on your iris. Read more from this special report:Technology and the Emerging Post-Privacy Era

These days gathering biometric data generally requires the cooperation (or coercion) of the subject: for your iris to get into a database, you have to let someone take a close-up photograph of your eyeball. That will not be the case for long. Department of Defense–funded researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are perfecting a camera that can take rapid-fire, database-quality iris scans of every person in a crowd from a distance of 10 meters.

New technologies will also make it possible to extract far more information from the biometrics we are already collecting. While most law-enforcement DNA databases contain only snippets of the genome, agencies can keep the physical DNA samples in perpetuity, raising the question of what future genetic-analysis tools will be able to discern. “Once you have somebody’s DNA, you have all sorts of very personal info,” Lynch says. “There is a lot of fear that people are going to start testing samples to look for a link between genes and propensity for crime.”

Current law is not even remotely prepared to handle these developments. The legal status of most types of biometric data is unclear. No court has addressed whether law enforcement can collect biometric data without a person’s knowledge, and case law says nothing about facial recognition….

2009

Plan to Introduce Biometric IDs Stirs Privacy Debate

Move would require establishing centralized database with biometric data on every citizen, legal resident of Israel.

Haaretz 13.03.2009

No other democracy has yet introduced biometric identity cards, which Israel recently decided to do, and the only nondemocracy to have done so is Hong Kong, according to a study by the Knesset’s research center.

One reason for this reluctance is that biometric identity cards require establishing a centralized database with biometric data on every citizen and legal resident of the country.

Biometric passports, in contrast, are becoming more common in the West. However because people can choose whether or not to obtain a passport, which is not true of ID cards, this is considered less problematic from the perspective of privacy.

The study was prepared in advance of last October’s Knesset debate on a bill to introduce biometric ID cards.

The Knesset passed it into law a few days before dissolving for the elections.

The law requires the state to take the fingerprints of both index fingers from every resident of the country, on top of the standard facial photographs.

Then interior minister Meir Sheetrit told the Knesset that current Israeli ID cards are very easily forged, and the law would make such forgeries harder.

Biometric cards would assist in “uprooting crime, foiling terror attacks and identifying victims,” he said.

He also noted that between 2003 and 2007, some 1,500 people requested a new identity card four times or more because theirs had been lost or stolen, and 12 people requested new cards more than 10 times.

Human rights groups fiercely oppose the law. “It’s not for nothing that no Western democracy has dared to institute such a dangerous database,” said attorney

Avner Pinchuk of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, adding that he feared the data would leak to the Internet.

However, the study found, a few European countries are now considering biometric IDs.

With regard to passports, the International Civil Aviation Organization has ordered all of its 190 member states to issue machine-readable IDs that include information about facial features by 2010, and 53 countries that account for some 80 percent of all passports worldwide had already done so by the end of last year.

The European Union has ordered all of its member states to introduce biometric passports that include fingerprints and facial features by this May.

The United States grants visa waivers only to countries that issue such passports.

2004

UK passport agency begins trial on biometric IDs

The UK Passport Service (UKPS) has launched its six month trial of biometric technology involving 10,000 volunteers, and at the…

Computer Weekly27 Apr 2004

The UK Passport Service (UKPS) has launched its six-month trial of biometric technology involving 10,000 volunteers, and at the same time, the UK government introduced its draft bill for biometric identity cards and a central database of all of its citizens.

ID cards will carry biometric identifiers in an embedded chip, which is then linked to a “secure national database” called the National Identity Register.

The database is expected to contain such information as name, address, date of birth, gender, immigration status and a confirmed biometric feature such as electronic fingerprint, a scan of the iris of the eye or of a full face.

The UKPS trial will test for all three biometrics traits: electronic fingerprint, a scan of the iris of the eye and a full face scan. 

“This is the first time that three different biometric technologies from three different suppliers have been integrated into one solution,” said a spokeswoman for Atos Origin, the company running the trial for the government.

The technical challenges may also account for why the trial, launched at Globe House, the London Passport Office, is three months behind the original launch date.

Atos Origin will be responsible for the delivery and installation of the equipment and software for the trial, while NEC is supplying its Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

Identix will provide the fingerprint capture and facial matching technology and Iridian Technologies is responsible for the iris recognition technology. The survey research component of the project will be undertaken by London-based market research company MORI.

memento mori

noun

me·​men·​to mo·​ri | \ mə-ˈmen-tō-ˈmȯr-ē  \plural memento mori

Definition of memento mori

a reminder of mortality

especiallyDEATH’S-HEAD

Examples of memento mori in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

But the pandemic—that inescapable memento mori—serves as a frame and a catalyst rather than a subject.— Claire Messud, Harper’s Magazine , 4 Jan. 2022

Fighting Demons, his second posthumous album is a tortured but overall grateful memento mori from a talented artist who left us all too soon.— Will Dukes, Rolling Stone, 16 Dec. 2021

SOURCE

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Life and existence are two separate things and the Vatican is doing a bait and switch on behalf of Klaus Schwab.
Humanism and Transhumanism are mutually exclusive, to advance in one is to leave the other, and if you don’t make your own wise choices, The Borg will, on your behalf.

And this just one of many examples of Transhumanist programs and activities going on under Vatican’s roof. Here are a few more samples:

Fallen Covid hero Francis Collins and two gay ninjas, I guess
From VATICAN HD channel

Do members of the Catholic faith plan to denounce this abomination before it completely implodes their thingy? Yesterday is the time.

Vatican Official Denies Church Going Bankrupt

By David Israel / jEWISH PRESS – October 23, 2019

Photo Credit: Courtesy Amazon

Gianluigi Nuzzi’s ‘Universal Judgment’

A Vatican official, Bishop Nunzio Galantino, on Tuesday denied reports that the Catholic Church is at risk of a financial default as a result of plummeting contributions.

In an interview with the Italian bishops’ conference’s newspaper Avvenire, Bishop Galantino, who is in charge of the Vatican’s investments, said “there is no threat of collapse or default here.”

Italian investigative journalist Gianluigi Nuzzi on October 21 published an investigative book titled “Giudizio Universale (Universal Judgment),” in which he reports that decades of mismanagement, shady deals and radically decreasing donations will result in the Vatican going bankrupt by 2023.

The book states that following the global rash of sexual abuse lawsuits, donations to the Vatican have dropped to $56.9 million in 2018, compared with $112.7 million in 2006.

The Vatican channels the contributions from Catholics into the Peter’s Pence collection, to be used by the pope for charity and emergency assistance; and a fund supporting the work of the Vatican. Nuzzi’s book reports that an estimated 58% of the donations to the Peter’s Pence collection were used “not for works of charity, but to fill in the (financial) gaps of the (Roman) Curia,” following the Church’s heavy losses in numerous court cases.

Recently, a new scandal has emerged, suggesting the Vatican has been speculating on a large-scale with funds from the Peter’s Pence collection – which will likely result in an even greater decline in contributions.

But Bishop Galantino insists the Vatican is doing fine, and that “there is only the need for a spending review, which is what we’re doing.”

SO DID THE WEF BAIL OUT THE VATICAN?

“The transHuman Code Meeting of The Minds” originated in Davos, Switzerland in 2015 where global leaders assembled to discuss the impending impact of the 4thIndustrial Revolution. 

Yahoo! Finance

This is a book that delivers a long-term view on how to manage the convergence of humanity and technology. Only David and Carlos have the foresight and network to bring together a stellar group of experts on the socio-political impact of techno-economical transformations happening on a daily basis all over the world. This is indeed a great platform to engage us all in a conversation that is so critical to our future!

Danil Kerimi – Head of the Technology Industries for the World Economic Forum where he facilitates the critical global dialogue between government, business and academic leaders on the future of technology


PRESS RELEASE PR Newswire
 Jan. 23, 2018, 11:30 AM

NEW YORK and LONDON, Jan. 23, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The TransHuman Code is the first interactive “knowledge platform” for managing the convergence of humanity and technology, its impact on our daily lives, and the long-term implications. This dynamic initiative will be introduced on January 24 at Davos, Switzerland during the world’s foremost assembly of international leaders. 

“The TransHuman Code Davos Gathering of Minds,” hosted by CBS Inside Edition Host, Megan Alexander, will bring together global leaders in technology, business, finance, government, academia and the media for an exclusive event.  The event will feature an interactive discussion amongst the assembled leading experts including:

Alex Pentland | Director, MIT Connection Services and Human Dynamics Lab

Evgeni Borisov | Founder and CEO, Vimana Global

Salim Ismail | Author,Exponential Organizations and Founding CEO, Singularity University

Greg Cross | Chief Business Officer, Soul Machines

Rachel | The World’s First Digital Person

Shantenu Agarwal | Director, IBM Watson

Rodrigo Arboleda | Chairman, Fast Track Institute

Wang Wei | Founder, China M&A Group

VATICAN HOSTS CONFERENCE TOUCHING ON TRANSHUMANISM

   by William Mahoney, Ph.D.  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  July 29, 2019

Humanity 2.0 and the Vatican discuss the transHuman Code

VATICAN CITY (ChurchMilitant.com) – With the support of the Pontifical Lateran University (PLU), globalists met in Vatican City on Monday to discuss the best path forward with humanity and technology in harmony.

The meeting has been described as an “exclusive gathering of technology, corporate, finance, government, academic, ecclesiastic and media leaders … to catalyze awareness and establish the best path forward with humanity and technology in harmony.”

Sponsored by OISTE Foundation, Humanity 2.0 held the meeting titled “Technology and Human Flourishing” with the support of the PLU at the Collegio Teutonico, which is adjacent to St. Peter’s Square.Humanity 2.0 developed in collaboration with the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development (DPIHD).GabTweet

Humanity 2.0 developed in collaboration with the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development (DPIHD) as “an agent of the common good and a believer in the need for a shared horizon to unite humankind,” according to the organization’s website.https://www.youtube.com/embed/YBwcC2GnY7s


Pope Francis created the DPIHD in August 2016 with the mission to promote “the integral development of the person in light of the Gospel and in line with the Social Doctrine of the Church.”

The DPIHD operates “by means of a network of interactions that involve local Churches, Episcopal Conferences, the other organs of the Roman Curia, the international organizations (both Catholic and non-Catholic), the relations with governments and supranational organizations,” according to the mission statement.

Humanity 2.0’s vision is defined by five beliefs, including a belief that we are one species with a collective responsibility for shaping our future and that challenges to humanity must be met by coordinated action.

Image

The organization attempts to achieve its ends in three ways, the third way being to bring aboard “religious organizations who are aligned in tackling the respective impediment and investing in the solution.”

The meeting at the Collegio Teutonico on Monday centered around talks by Carlos Moreira and David Fergusson and their co-authored book, The transHuman Code: How to Program Your Future, as well as Fr. Philip Larrey and his book, Artificial Humanity: An Essay on the Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence.

Moreira is an active leader and member of several institutions and organizations focused on the advancement of technological innovation and preservation of human identity.

Fergusson is a corporate finance leader specializing in global mergers and acquisitions.

Father Philip Larrey is a Catholic priest who holds the chair of Logic and Epistemology at the Pontifical Lateran University in the Vatican and the chairman of Humanity 2.0.Fergusson is a corporate finance leader specializing in global mergers and acquisitions.

According to the transHuman Code‘s synopsis:

Image
Fr. Philip Larrey

What the authors propose is that if we start the design of the transHuman future from a human perspective, making sure that technology will inspire revolution or evolution, then we can ensure humanity continues to thrive. The transHuman Code tries to center humanity in the emerging tension between a human-controlled or a machine-controlled world. Moreira and Fergusson examine how humans can maintain the uniqueness and the humanity of this brave new world.

Larrey’s book, Artificial Humanity, offers a philosophical discussion on artificial intelligence.

OISTE, the sponsor of Humanity 2.0’s recent gathering in Vatican City, has a consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the UN and is an accredited member of the non-commercial Users Stakeholders Group of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. •  ChurchMilitant.com

“In The transHuman Code, authors Carlos Moreira and David Fergusson ask, “Are we building a better future for humanity with the help of magnificent technology or are we instead building a better future of better technology at the expense of humanity?” We must learn to put humanity first instead of getting caught up in the promise of technological advancement. Humans have been able to adapt, morph, and compromise in every situation we have faced over the centuries and have been able to maintain dominance. We must approach the promises of technology with the same adaptability.

What the authors propose is that if we start the design of the transHuman future from a human perspective, making sure that technology will inspire revolution or evolution, then we can ensure humanity continues to thrive. The transHuman Code tries to center humanity in the emerging tension between a human-controlled or a machine-controlled world. Moreira and Fergusson examine how humans can maintain the uniqueness and the humanity in this brave new world.” – https://www.transhumancode.com/

Transhuman Code authors discuss digital ID’s and a centralized AI-controlled society. In 2018

About WISeKey

WISeKey (SIX Swiss Exchange: WIHN) is a leading global cybersecurity company currently deploying large scale digital identity ecosystems for people and objects using Blockchain, AI and IoT respecting the Human as the Fulcrum of the Internet. WISeKey Microprocessors Secures the pervasive computing shaping today’s Internet of Everything. WISeKey IoT has an install base of over 1.5 billion microchips in virtually all IoT sectors (connected cars, smart cities, drones, agricultural sensors, anti-counterfeiting, smart lighting, servers, computers, mobile phones, crypto tokens etc.).  WISeKey is uniquely positioned to be at the edge of IoT as our semiconductors produce a huge amount of Big Data that, when analyzed with Artificial Intelligence (AI), can help industrial applications to predict the failure of their equipment before it happens.

Our technology is Trusted by the OISTE/WISeKey’s Swiss based cryptographic Root of Trust (“RoT”) provides secure authentication and identification, in both physical and virtual environments, for the Internet of Things, Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence. The WISeKey RoT serves as a common trust anchor to ensure the integrity of online transactions among objects and between objects and people. – GLOBENEWSWIRE.com

LOOKS FAMILIAR?

WISeKey, OISTE.ORG and the Trust Protocol Association to Help Health Organizations Deploy a Covid-19 Trusted Health Passport on the Blockchain

Press release posted May 21st, 2020 for WISeKey and archived here

WISeKey, OISTE.ORG and the Trust Protocol Association to Help Health Organizations Deploy a Covid-19 Trusted Health Passport on the Blockchain

The project is under the supervision of a new association, the Trust Protocol Association, established last January as an independent, not-for-profit membership organization, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland

Geneva, Switzerland – May 22, 2020 – The purpose of the Trust Protocol Association is to establish a new Trust Protocol for the Internet combining traditional Cryptographic Trust Models with distributed blockchain ledgers creating a new Global Trust platform.

The mission of the Association is to create an ecosystem of governmental, technology and business partners, each representing a node with the possibility to have multiple nodes per country.

Blockchain-based solutions aim to override the need for a central authority by distributing information previously held in a centralized repository across a network of participating nodes. While Blockchain is not owned by one individual or organization, anyone with an internet connection (and access, in the case of private Blockchains) can make use of it, help maintain and verify it. When a transaction is made on a Blockchain, it is added to a group of transactions, known as ‘blocks”. Each block of transactions is added to the database in a chronological, immutable chain. Each block is stamped with a unique cryptographic code, which ensures that records are not counterfeited or changed. The Blockchain approach lacks legal validity in most jurisdictions, which only recognize the digital signatures as equally valid that manuscript signatures when generated using traditional PKI technology.

The Trust Protocol Association is working with a number of members in USA, Asia MEA and Europe to deploy a fully compliant Trusted Health Passport using the WIShelter Version 2, a new application in the WISeID App ecosystem, designed to remediate risks during the global COVID-19 lockdown period. Using their digital identity secured by WISeKey, users will be able to geo-localize other certified users and stablish secure communications. If needed, the app allows users to prove to local authorities that they are respecting the stay at home recommendations. To ensure the data privacy, each user’s Personal Identifiable Information is kept encrypted and never disclosed without their consent.
WIShelter app is based on WISeID, WISekey’s Digital Identity platform and combines in a unified solution a suite of web services and mobile applications:

  1. The WISeID Account:   a digital identity with a unique credential that can be used to access all of WISeKey’s services and other affiliated services
  2. A Digital Certificate :  offers strong authentication and digital signatures which can be also used to protect users’ email and communication during Teleworking
  3. A Personal Encrypted Vault : provides secure storage of confidential information, including the medical details

The new features of the WIShelter Version 2 include a full health digital certificate that is imported into the App by connecting it to the medical record of the patient issued by a bona fide qualified health certification program on which Doctors and Medical Facilities can join.
The App’s secure QR Code provides access to the user’s WISeID Health Card. The QR Code is displayed in three colors:
– Green: the person is healthy
– Yellow: the person’s health is compromised
– Red: the person has a health problem

The WISeID Health Card includes important medical details like blood type, allergies, and other medical conditions, and can be enriched with digital health certificates, as it’s the case of the result of an official COVID-19 test.
This simple method to display the Health Card could allow law enforcement and other public services to apply controls during the de-escalation phase of the pandemic.
All health details are encrypted and linked to the user’s identity, represented by a Digital Certificate. Encrypting this data is important to protect user’s confidential information and ensuring that the user is staying up-to-date with its health credentials, and is in compliance with all privacy requirements, like the European General Data Protection Regulation (Directive 95/46/EC), known as GDPR, the primary law regulating how companies protect EU citizens’ personal data.
WISeKey is a fully Qualified Trust Service Provider (TSP) under eIDAS, the updated EU regulations dealing with trusted eID and electronic transactions and Webtrust.ORG.

WISekey is currently working with several governments and health organizations to add functionalities to the WIShelter app such as the ability for users to upload and digitally certify the results of their COVID-19 test. These functionalities will allow local governments to enable healthy/immured persons to safely return to their jobs thus reduce the economic impact of the epidemic while protecting the high-risk population by controlling the spread of this infectious disease. 
For almost two decades, WISeKey has contributed to the design and implementation of global standards for the internet’s long-missing identity layer: decentralized, point-to-point exchange of information about people, organizations, or things – enabled by blockchain and certified by cryptographic Root of Trust. WISeKey’s technology, products and services can be used by individuals and organizations.

To that effect, WISekey has launched an enhanced version of WISeID, adding easy to use strong authentication and email security capabilities that can remediate threats like phishing, ransomware or identity theft. Strong Authentication is a mechanism able to enhance security by complementing the traditional username/password access to online services with additional security factors, like biometry, hardware tokens and one-time-passwords. Additionally, secure eMail techniques allow confidential messages to be exchanged encrypted, and to affix a “digital signature” to the outgoing email, ensuring the recipient that the message comes from a genuine person and that has not been manipulated in the way.

About WISeKey

WISeKey (NASDAQ: WKEY; SIX Swiss Exchange: WIHN) is a leading global cybersecurity company currently deploying large scale digital identity ecosystems for people and objects using Blockchain, AI and IoT respecting the Human as the Fulcrum of the Internet. WISeKey microprocessors secure the pervasive computing shaping today’s Internet of Everything. WISeKey IoT has an install base of over 1.5 billion microchips in virtually all IoT sectors (connected cars, smart cities, drones, agricultural sensors, anti-counterfeiting, smart lighting, servers, computers, mobile phones, crypto tokens etc.).  WISeKey is uniquely positioned to be at the edge of IoT as our semiconductors produce a huge amount of Big Data that, when analyzed with Artificial Intelligence (AI), can help industrial applications to predict the failure of their equipment before it happens.
Our technology is Trusted by the OISTE/WISeKey’s Swiss based cryptographic Root of Trust (“RoT”) provides secure authentication and identification, in both physical and virtual environments, for the Internet of Things, Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence. The WISeKey RoT serves as a common trust anchor to ensure the integrity of online transactions among objects and between objects and people. For more information, visit  www.wisekey.com .

About the Trust protocol Association
The purpose of the Trust Protocol Association (the Association) is to establish a new Trust Protocol for the Internet by combining traditional Cryptographic Trust Models with permissioned Blockchain transactions through strong authentication provided by the OISTE WISeKey Root of Trust, and create a new Global Trust platform and an ecosystem of governmental, technology and business partners, each representing a certification node with the possibility of having multiple certifications nodes per country. The Association promotes the use of Blockchain technologies internationally, facilitate the rapid adaptation and on-boarding of Blockchain-based solutions, foster stronger collaboration between the public, private and academic sectors.

https://trustprotocolassociation.org/

About OISTE FOUNDATION

Founded in Switzerland in 1998, OISTE was created with the objectives of promoting the use and adoption of international standards to secure electronic transactions, expand the use of digital certification and ensure the interoperability of certification authorities’ e-transaction systems.
The OISTE Foundation is a not for profit organization based in Geneva, Switzerland, regulated by article 80 et seq. of the Swiss Civil Code. OISTE is an organization in special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) and belongs to the Not-for-Profit constituency (NPOC) of the ICANN.  http://www.oiste.org/ .

Mission: transfer the control and management of technologies dealing with digital identities to neutral authorities working for the public interest.

Vision: an Internet where users engage in online transactions and communications under systems of digital identity management that offer robust protection against fraud and theft, while protecting the fundamental right to privacy.

THE INTERNET OF BODIES AKA THE BORG IS HERE, KLAUS SCHWAB SAYS (BIOHACKING P.5)

You see, symbiosis is a concept that refers to the cooperation for survival between two living organisms, man-machine symbiosis is an oxymoron.

Dead matter cannot function like living matter and substitute it. Schwab’s AIs and implants, al the goddamn Borg, is nothing but a pirate’s wooden leg connecting to Internet.

The ‘thingification’ of people is but gradual extinction.

It’s called TRANShumanism, because it departs from Humanism and life, it drops a few nukes on its, way out and outside the departure location only death awaits. Prolonged existence too, maybe, but the further into Transhumanism you go, the closer to a dead object / device status you get.

LATER UPDATE:

TRANSHUMANISM: RICH DEGENERATES WHO HAVEN’T GROWN OVER THEIR FEAR OF DEATH

ALSO SEE:

FORMER VATICAN AMBASSADOR TO US: “JUST AS THERE IS A DEEP STATE, THERE IS A DEEP CHURCH. COVID-19 A COLOSSAL OPERATION OF SOCIAL ENGINEERING”

WE WRITE NEW DNA USING RNA ONLY – STAR SCIENTIST FINANCED BY EPSTEIN, DARPA AND SCHWAB’S WYSS INST.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN AND THE DECADENCE OF SCIENCE

To be continued?
Our work and existence, as media and people, is funded solely by our most generous readers and we want to keep this way.
Help SILVIEW.media survive and grow, please donate here, anything helps. Thank you!

! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

This life-changing information has been sitting on UK Government’s website for over 15 months now. People find out about it from us, while their officials keep yapping 24/7 about an infection we can’t test for and a virus that’s never been properly isolated and purified in a lab as per Koch’s Postulate.
Of course, this plan is not limited to UK, it’s global.
Looks like democracy is as real as Rona, your informed consent matters and governments care.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is not a buzzword, it’s official policy in every state controlled by the World Bank /IMF / Rothschild dynasty. It’s been so for long now. And The Great Reset gives you the map for it, in that Technocrat language that is translated to functional-illiterate sheeple as whatever they need to hear to stay obedient, while the sheeple-herders get actual live-stock management advice.

Policy paper

Regulation for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Published 11 June 2019

Presented to Parliament
by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
by Command of Her Majesty

Excerpts selected by Silview.media, read the whole thing please!

Foreword

The world is changing faster than ever. New technology is creating new industries, changing existing ones and transforming the way things are made. We need a more agile approach to regulation, that supports innovation while protecting citizens and the environment.

We are a nation of innovators. Throughout our history we have seized the opportunities to create a better future for ourselves. In the First Industrial Revolution, British engineer Thomas Savery’s pump paved the way for industrial use of steam power. In the second, British scientist Michael Faraday’s electromagnetic rotary devices formed the basis for practical electricity use. In the third, British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web.

Technological breakthroughs in areas from artificial intelligence to biotechnologies are now heralding a Fourth Industrial Revolution, with the power to reshape almost every sector in every country. Our Industrial Strategy positions the UK to make the most of this global transformation.

Our regulatory system is second to none, as recognised by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Regulatory Policy Outlook in 2018. It protects citizens and enables business to thrive. Together with our global research prowess, world-class universities and open, competitive markets, it attracts firms to innovate and invest in the UK. As the Fourth Industrial Revolution changes the way we live and work, it is vital that our regulatory system keeps pace.

This white paper sets out our plan to maintain our world-leading regulatory system in this period of rapid technological change. We will support and stimulate new products, services and business models, with greater space for experimentation. We will uphold safeguards for people and the environment and engage the public in how innovation is regulated. And we will maintain the stable, proportionate regulatory approach the UK is rightly known for.

Our openness to technology and innovation continues as we leave the European Union.

This white paper is our plan to secure our success.

Rt Hon Greg Clark MP
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Championing innovation

We need to take action to maintain our world-beating regulatory system and realise the potential of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is of a scale, speed and complexity that is unprecedented. It is characterised by a fusion of technologies – such as artificial intelligence, gene editing and advanced robotics – that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital and biological worlds. It will disrupt nearly every industry in every country, creating new opportunities and challenges for people, places and businesses to which we must respond.

Our modern Industrial Strategy seeks to put the UK at the crest of this global wave of technological innovation, bringing the benefits to business and consumers alike. Our foundations are strong. The UK ranks in the top 5 in the Global Innovation Index1. We are a global leader in science and research and home to 4 of the top 10 universities in the world2. We have a thriving start-up environment and are home to many of the world’s most R&D-intensive businesses. We develop and attract some of the most talented people in the world.

We want to build on our strengths in developing and deploying ideas to become the world’s most innovative economy. We want to raise our total investment in R&D to 2.4% of GDP by 2027, the biggest increase on record. We have set 4 Grand Challenges for the UK government and wider economy to seize the opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The Industrial Strategy Grand Challenges

  1. We will put the UK at the forefront of the artificial intelligence and data revolution.
  2. We will maximise the advantages for UK industry of the shift to clean growth.
  3. We will become a world leader in shaping the future of mobility.
  4. We will harness the power of innovation to help meet the needs of an ageing society.

Our regulatory system is a national asset. We are ranked 9th among 190 economies for the ease of doing business in the UK3, with the quality of our regulatory practices given the highest overall country score by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)4. We protect the natural environment and ensure the safety and employment rights of citizens. We also provide the certainty needed for businesses to thrive.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution presents challenges for regulatory systems across the globe, as they struggle to keep pace with rapid, complex technological innovation. In our Industrial Strategy, we committed to develop an agile regulatory approach that supports innovation and protects citizens and the environment. We need to act now to maintain our world-beating regulatory system in this period of transformational change.

regulations

We need to reshape our regulatory approach so that it supports and stimulates innovation that benefits citizens and the economy. At present, only 29% of businesses believe that the government’s approach to regulation facilitates innovative products and services being efficiently brought to market 9. The need for reform is urgent: 92% of businesses from a range of sectors think they will feel a negative impact if regulators don’t evolve to keep pace with disruptive change in the next 2 to 3 years10.

Other countries are rapidly reforming their regulatory environments to support future innovation, with Nesta describing these anticipatory approaches as ‘an increasingly important source of competitive advantage in the global economy’11. By taking an anticipatory approach we can give people faster access to innovations that can transform their lives and attract the ideas, talent and investment to the UK that will drive our future prosperity.

We are turning things round. The Financial Conduct Authority’s regulatory sandbox has kick-started a wave of regulator-led initiatives to support new products and services to come to market and been widely emulated across the globe. Our Regulators’ Pioneer Fund is accelerating the change, with £10 million invested in 15 projects to support technologies from autonomous shipping to virtual lawyers. We have established a partnership with the World Economic Forum to shape the global governance of technological innovation.

But we can go further. The Business Secretary has established a Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation to drive reform across government to put us at the forefront of the industries of the future. The Prime Minister’s Council for Science and Technology has provided recommendations on how to enhance the regulatory oversight of technological innovation. We have identified 6 challenges we need to address:

  • we need to be on the front foot in reforming regulation in response to technological innovation
  • we need to ensure that our regulatory system is sufficiently flexible and outcomes-focused to enable innovation to thrive
  • we need to enable greater experimentation, testing and trialling of innovations under regulatory supervision
  • we need to support innovators to navigate the regulatory landscape and comply with regulation
  • we need to build dialogue with society and industry on how technological innovation should be regulated
  • we need to work with partners across the globe to reduce regulatory barriers to trade in innovative products and services

This white paper sets out our plan to tackle these 6 challenges and seize the opportunity presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. We want to lead the world in innovation-friendly regulation that supports the emergence of new products, services and business models for the benefit of all. The white paper will be matched later this year with papers describing how we will modernise consumer and competition regulation in response to the transformation in our economy.

Supporting the emergence of smart systems

Our energy system is changing rapidly. There is more low carbon generation, such as power from solar and wind, which produces different amounts of electricity depending on the weather. It is increasingly decentralised, with generation and batteries located in or near people’s homes and businesses.   New technologies such as electricity storage, smart heating controls and electric vehicles are emerging which can be used to help balance the electricity system. However, our regulatory system was not developed with these new technologies in mind. 

As laid out in the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, developed jointly with the energy regulator Ofgem, we are working to develop a best in class regulatory framework that supports these innovations. We are working with industry to reform markets, legislation, licences, codes and standards.

The drive towards a smart and flexible energy system is an important tenet of the government’s Clean Growth and Industrial Strategies. The changes promise to provide significant public benefits, from lower energy bills to cleaner air and lower carbon emissions. By 2050, a smarter and more flexible system could save the UK £17-40 billion.

Accelerating the introduction of self-driving vehicles

The Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAV) is overseeing a groundbreaking programme to prepare the UK’s regulatory framework for self-driving vehicles ahead of their introduction on UK roads. It has developed an open regulatory approach that safeguards citizens and supports the development of the technology as it evolves.

This includes the recently updated world-leading Code of Practice for testing automated vehicles. Testing any level of automated vehicles on public roads is possible, provided they comply with the law, including having a driver, in or out of the vehicle, a roadworthy vehicle, and appropriate insurance. The recent update to the Code announced that the government would introduce an application process for more advanced trials. This will facilitate the development of the technology, without the need for repeated changes to regulation.

CCAV is leading the charge in considering the wider implications of the introduction of self-driving vehicles. It has introduced legislation to insure the use of self-driving vehicles through the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018, so that victims of collisions get quick and easy access to compensation. It has asked the Law Commission of England and Wales and the Scottish Law Commission to undertake a joint regulatory review to identify further legal obstacles to the widespread introduction of self-driving vehicles. This project is consulting widely and will provide a final report in 2021.

CCAV is also working with the British Standards Institution to deliver a programme of standards to help accelerate development and deployment of self-driving vehicles. The programme seeks to address public safety and reliability concerns and supports the UK’s reputation as a centre of excellence for vehicle testing, design and manufacturing.

CCAV’s programme has helped to put the UK at the forefront of this emerging industry and, with the Department for Transport, given the UK lasting influence in international debates on the regulation of automated vehicles.

Our plan

We will create an outcome-focused, flexible regulatory system that enables innovation to thrive while protecting citizens and the environment. We will match this with clarity for business through better use of regulatory guidance, codes of practice and industry standards.

We will pilot an innovation test so that the impact of legislation on innovation is considered as we:

  • develop and assess policy options
  • consult and engage on policy proposals
  • design, introduce and implement legislation
  • monitor, evaluate and review legislation

We will encourage policymakers to consider the governance of innovation in a holistic way, noting the role that alternatives to regulation can play in providing government, citizens and businesses with assurance. We will encourage policymakers to reflect on when the right time is to introduce regulation21 .

Our approach will encourage policymakers to focus on real-world outcomes, with legislation that provides flexibility for experimentation and adaptation. Prescriptive regulatory requirements would only be set out in legislation where necessary to provide important protections. Where possible, alternative approaches such as statutory guidance will set out requirements so that as technology changes the system can respond in a timely and flexible manner.

We will develop tools for policymakers to support them to consider these issues; we will also develop improved analytical methods to capture the impact of regulation on innovation. During the pilot, we will invite the Regulatory Policy Committee to scrutinise the application of the innovation test, to ensure that innovators have confidence in how government is developing significant new regulatory legislation.

Making the UK the safest place in the world to be online

The internet is a powerful force for good. Combined with new technologies such as artificial intelligence, it is changing society perhaps more than any previous technological revolution – growing the economy, making us more productive, and raising living standards.

Alongside these new opportunities come new challenges and risks. The internet can be used to spread terrorist material; it can be a tool for abuse and bullying; and it can be used to undermine civil discourse, objective news and intellectual property. As set out in our Digital Charter, we are committed to making the UK both the safest place to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business.

In April, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Home Office published a white paper to tackle a range of both legal and illegal harms, from cyberbullying to online child sexual exploitation. In keeping with our ambition to lead the world in innovation-friendly regulation that encourages the tech sector and provides stability for businesses, the white paper sets out an outcomes-focused legislative approach that will support future technological change.

Read more

Realising the power of financial technologies

From AI to blockchain, data-driven financial technologies (FinTech) are changing the way that we bank, invest, insure and even pay for things. The UK’s FinTech sector is booming, underpinned by our world-leading financial services sector and thriving tech scene.

In 2016, the Financial Conduct Authority seized the initiative to support this emerging industry by establishing the world’s first ‘regulatory sandbox’: a safe space where firms can work with the regulator to trial innovative products, services and business models with consumers without having to meet all the usual requirements for compliance. Since its establishment, the sandbox has received more than 3 times as many applications than places available. Access to the sandbox has helped reduce the time and cost of getting innovative ideas to market (in the first year, 90% of firms progressed towards wider market launch) and improve access to finance (40% received investment during or following their sandbox tests).

FinTech firm Asset Hedge introduced a web-based platform offering forex options to assist small businesses and individuals to protect against losses incurred because of currency fluctuations. They successfully completed the sandbox programme to become a fully regulated company. Assure Hedge founder and chief executive Barry McCarthy said:

“We have effectively been given the same regulation that large banks have, so it really allows us to compete with the big players.”

It’s not just business that benefits. Consumers benefit from new products which have better safeguards built in up front, while the regulator benefits from greater insight into technological innovation. The model has been emulated by more than 20 countries across the globe and translated to sectors from health to transport.

From smart shipping to AI-powered legal services

The Regulators’ Pioneer Fund is backing the Future of Mobility and AI and Data Grand Challenges through ground breaking projects to enable technologies from smart shipping to AI-powered legal services.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has already taken steps to facilitate innovation in the legal industry, inviting firms to develop new business models in a controlled way. The Regulators’ Pioneer Fund investment will enable the Solicitors Regulation Authority to work with the innovation foundation Nesta to accelerate ethical AI-powered innovations, with a focus on legal services for small businesses and consumers where AI and automation can have transformative impact.

Paul Philip, Chief Executive of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, said:

“Smart use of technology could help tackle the problem that far too many people struggle to access expert legal advice. It will help us further build on our work to encourage new ways of delivering legal services, benefiting both the public and small business.”

In the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund investment will create the Maritime Autonomy Regulation Lab (MAR Lab) to bring together industry specialists, academics and government to pioneer new regulatory approaches and make data available to the emerging smart shipping industry.

The project will inform UK legislation for a domestic framework for autonomous vessels to attract international business and support and promote testing in the UK’s territorial waters. It will also support government efforts to establish a new proactive and adaptive international regulatory framework for autonomous vessels at the International Maritime Organisation.

Read: THE ROADMAP FOR THE 2025-2028 PANDEMIC ALREADY PUBLISHED BY EVENT 201 ORGANISERS

Supporting the revolution in life sciences

New discoveries and the application of new technologies mean we can diagnose illnesses earlier and more accurately, create new treatments and ensure existing ones are more effective.

The UK is extraordinarily well placed to play a leading role in this revolution in the life sciences, with strengths in innovation, research, healthcare and business. To support these innovations to come to market, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency’s (MHRA) Innovation Office provides a single point of access to regulatory advice on the development of innovative medicines, medical devices or manufacturing processes. The service has grown in popularity since its inception in 2013, receiving 190 enquiries in 2018.

The service helps to make regulatory information clear and accessible to those who are working on innovative research, supporting a key goal in the second Life Sciences Sector Deal to ensure the UK remains one of the best places in the world to develop life sciences projects, to protect health and improve lives.

The service has helped secure significant investments into the UK life sciences industry. John Parker, Director at AstraZeneca said:

“We genuinely believe that having easy access to MHRA in this manner provides a real competitive advantage to UK based companies”

In the Life Sciences Sector Deal, the MHRA committed to engage with industry to understand how it can further develop its offer by the end of 2019.

Our plan

Entrepreneurs and innovative firms should be able to find their way through the UK’s regulatory landscape with ease and receive timely, joined-up feedback on novel propositions.

We will consult on a digital Regulation Navigator for businesses to help them find their way through the regulatory landscape and engage with the right regulators at the right time on their proposals. We will ensure that this is integrated with action to enhance the government’s digital offer to business in areas such as tax, grants, trade and investment, and build awareness of the available offer.

Initiatives such as the Financial Conduct Authority’s regulatory sandbox have helped reduce the time and cost of bringing new products and services to market and enabled businesses to win contracts and secure access to finance. We are funding greater investment in specialist regulatory advice services for innovators through our Regulators’ Pioneer Fund, to ensure that innovators who are developing novel proposals with potential for wider economic, societal or environmental benefit are supported to do so.

Leading the public dialogue on mitochondrial replacement treatment

Mitochondria are present in almost all human cells and generate the majority of their energy supply. Unhealthy mitochondria can cause genetic disorders known as mitochondrial disease, which can have devastating effects on the families that carry them. For many patients with mitochondrial diseases, preventing the transmission of the disease to their children is a key concern.

In 2012, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority undertook a sustained engagement programme to determine public acceptability of the use of mitochondrial replacement treatment, characterised in the media as ‘3 parent babies’. The programme included a breadth of engagement tools, including workshops, a public survey, open meetings and focus groups. It invited trusted scientific figures to take part in the debate.

The regulator found that despite certain ethical concerns there was general support for permitting mitochondria replacement in the UK, so long as it is safe enough to offer in a treatment setting and is done so within a regulatory framework. Following legislation, in 2017 the UK became the first country in the world to license mitochondrial donation techniques to allow women who carry the risk of serious mitochondrial disease to avoid passing it onto their children.

Our plan

We want innovators and the public to have confidence in the UK’s regulatory regime. We will build dialogue with society and industry on how technological innovation should be regulated.

We will ask the Regulatory Horizons Council to identify priorities for greater public engagement on regulation of innovation. For example, where technologies pose complex ethical or moral considerations greater public engagement may be appropriate to shape government thinking on appropriate regulatory frameworks. Government departments and regulators will continue to lead public engagement on their policies, working with expert bodies such as the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation.

As part of its role, the Better Regulation Executive will provide support, advice and share best practice with policymakers and regulators on public engagement techniques to support appropriate regulation of technological innovation, working with partners such as Sciencewise. The Better Regulation Executive will build capability in novel and creative public engagement techniques that go beyond public consultation in this important area.

Engaging the public on regulation of drones

Drone technology is advancing rapidly with the potential to perform critical services in everyday life – from transporting urgent medical supplies to bridge inspection and repair. UK cities and regions need to consider what they want the future of drone applications to look like. PwC estimates that by 2030 drone use could increase UK GDP by £42 billion.

With support from the government’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, the innovation foundation Nesta funded public use analysis of drones in 5 cities for activities from inspecting burning buildings to traffic incident response. It worked with the government and the Civil Aviation Authority and convened local stakeholders to assess demand and identified the technical, economic and regulatory success factors for safe drone deployment at scale in cities.

The programme has concluded that there is demand for drones, which can fulfil socially beneficial goals. However, there are regulatory challenges that need to be solved – from how to deploy drones over long distances to what is publicly acceptable in terms of noise, privacy, safety and other issues. These issues are being considered as part of the Department for Transport’s Aviation Strategy 2050 green paper, looking at how a flexible regulatory framework can be established to support transport innovation under the Future of Mobility Grand Challenge and beyond.

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Illustration of a city of the future. (Credit: Innovate UK).
Credit: Innovate UK

Setting global standards on smart cities

Many cities face challenges in ensuring sustainable growth, with issues ranging from provision of water and energy to management of healthcare and transport. A range of innovation is emerging to create the smart cities of the future.

The British Standards Institution has developed a ground-breaking series of standards on smart cities, in collaboration with the Future Cities Catapult. International recognition of the smart cities standards programme contributes to the UK’s reputation in advanced urban services and helps shape the global market in line with established UK good practice.

Downloaded in over 60 countries, UK smart city standards are being adopted as international standards. In China, the world’s largest smart cities market, the British Standards Institution has set up a cooperation agreement on smart cities with the Standards Administration of China to develop a common approach to smart cities between UK and Chinese cities and companies.

Conclusion

This white paper is our long-term strategy for maintaining our world-leading regulatory environment as we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation will drive its delivery, supported by the Better Regulation Executive.

The white paper is a plan for the whole of government, shaping how we will regulate in areas from healthcare to transport. We want to give businesses confidence to innovate and invest in the UK and give citizens confidence in our protections.

In addressing these issues we respect the devolution settlements with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. We will work with our partners in the devolved administrations and local authorities to share our innovation-enabling approach and ensure that every part of the UK benefits from the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Summary of commitments

Facing the future

  • We will establish a Regulatory Horizons Council to identify the implications of technological innovation and advise the government on regulatory reform needed to support its rapid and safe introduction.
  • The Council will prepare a regular report on innovation across the economy, with recommendations on priorities for regulatory reform to put the UK at the forefront of the industries of the future.
  • The Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation, chaired by the Business Secretary, will oversee the government response to the Council’s recommendations.

Focusing on outcomes

  • We will pilot an innovation test so that the impact of legislation on innovation is considered during the development of policy, introduction and implementation of legislation and its evaluation and review.
  • During the pilot, we will invite the Regulatory Policy Committee to scrutinise the application of the innovation test, to ensure that innovators have confidence in how government is developing new legislation.
  • We will promote new ways to trigger when post-implementation reviews of legislation are undertaken to ensure that legislation does not inadvertently ‘lock in’ outdated technologies or approaches.
  • We will develop tools for regulators to support them to review their guidance, codes of practice and other regulatory mechanisms to ensure that they provide flexibility for those businesses that want to innovate, while ensuring a clear route to compliance.
  • We will support business, policymakers and regulators to make effective use of standards where appropriate as a complement to legislation.
  • We will invite the Office for Product Safety and Standards, British Standards Institution, National Physical Laboratory and UK Accreditation Service to set out their vision for how the development and review of standards should evolve as we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Supporting experimentation

  • We will examine the case for expanding the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund in future to help regulators to keep pace with technological innovation and enable the emergence of new products, services and business models.
  • We will examine the case for extending the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund to local authorities in future, in order to help them support greater testing and trialling of innovations in their area.
  • We have established a Regulators’ Innovation Network to help foster a culture of experimentation across regulators and share best practice.
  • We will ask regulators to go further to evaluate the impact of their initiatives on innovation and consider whether to commence statutory reporting requirements for regulators on the impact of the economic growth duty.
  • We will survey innovators and regulators to identify data that could be shared to enable disruptors to enter markets and deliver better outcomes for all.

Improving access

  • We will consult on a digital Regulation Navigator for businesses to help them find their way through the regulatory landscape and engage with the right regulators at the right time on their proposals.
  • We have financed greater investment in specialist regulatory advice services for innovators through the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund.
  • We will scope and consult on measures to enhance co-ordination between regulators to ensure that innovations are guided smoothly through the system.
  • We will consider whether the Regulation Navigator should include functions for businesses to raise where rules or processes are inappropriately constraining innovation, so that regulators can review, clarify and potentially amend their approach.
  • We will invite regulators to develop metrics on the service that they provide to innovators.
  • We will ensure that data from specialist advice services is fed into the Regulatory Horizons Council, so that it can advise on where regulatory change or additional investment may be needed to enable innovation to thrive.

Building dialogue

  • We will ask the Regulatory Horizons Council to identify priorities for greater public engagement on regulation of innovation.
  • We will provide support, advice and share best practice with policymakers and regulators on public engagement techniques to support appropriate regulation of technological innovation.
  • We will encourage regulators to build public dialogue into experimentation initiatives (such as those financed through the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund), so that public views are considered as new products, services and business models are trialled.

Leading the world

  • We have established a partnership with the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution in San Francisco to develop regulatory approaches for new technologies.
  • We are working with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to explore the regulatory challenges of the emerging digital economy.
  • We will improve awareness of the effects of regulation on trade among government departments and regulators so that the impacts of regulatory divergence are systematically considered.
  • We will seek to include ambitious chapters on good regulatory practices and regulatory co-operation in future free trade agreements that the UK negotiates following our exit from the European Union.
  • We will continue working alongside other nations in the international and regional standards organisations, to help secure globally accepted standards for innovators to collaborate effectively in international markets.

To be continued?
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