by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu_ Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

In my latest article I dared everyone to find out the identity of Klaus Schwab’s parents (the mastermind behind WEF / The Great Reset). No one has provided so far, the call is still open for all researchers. But at least I’m now able to prove who his spiritual parent is and how that falls in the grand scheme.

Since the first day I got introduced to Klaus Schwab’s Great Reset I’ve seen Kissinger’s fingerprints all over it, but I had no hard evidence. Now we have it.
Second question that arose upon research was how did this engineer become the prime-minister of world’s shadow government? I’ve seen much brighter people die in misery. I see his main financial backing was from Rothschilds / World Bank, is/was his mother a Rothschild maybe? We can only speculate since he erased his family from Internet records.
But this video I’ve just unearthed (taken from a conference in Singapore, in 2016) cements him near Soros and Kissinger, as part of the ideological and executive triad that engineered the Rothschild – China alliance. As I’ve shown in a previous article, this alliance is at the core of the high-tech-globalist-communist regime that’s being rolled over the world right now under The Great Reset / Fourth Industrial Revolution brands and under the Covid-19 pandemic as a cover. Even the #Kraken can be traced back to them.
Below is the rest of the illustrated scheme. I tried to keep it as brief as possible, which was not an easy task given the abundance of ignored evidences.

Read
From South China Morning Post
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang greets Klaus Schwab during 2017’s WEF in China
Who said #Kraken?

Aaand the answer to our headline question is:

UPDATE:
The new culmination of this global power reset:

Read: HUGE! TRUMP’S JUST OUSTED KISSINGER FROM THE PENTAGON DEFENSE POLICY BOARD, SEVERING MORE TIES WITH CHINA AND GLOBALISTS

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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu_ Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

No intro needed for the villain of the season.

7.

He’s a former member of Bilderberg’s Steering Group. Unsurprisingly, I admit, but wait.

Bilderberg is governed by a Steering Committee which designates a Chairman; members are elected for a term of four years and can be re-elected. There are no other members of the Bilderberg conference.The Chair’s main responsibilities are to chair the Steering Committee and to prepare with the Steering Committee the conference program, the selection of participants. He also makes suggestions to the Steering Committee regarding its composition. The Executive Secretary reports to the Chairman. – Source

6.

Source

5.

Last few years, he’s been preparing to step down from the WEF leadership, which will be taken over by a team. We don’t know who’s in this team, but I’ll shave my head if China isn’t well represented.

2015 interview

4.

Klaus Schwab is also very involved with another elite organization that studies how to change The Universal Declaration of Human Rights so they can harmonize it with the globalist agenda that includes a global citizenship, among others.

The Global Citizenship Commission was convened, under the leadership of former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and the auspices of NYUs Global Institute for Advanced Study, to re-examine the spirit and stirring words of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The result this volume offers a 21st-century commentary on the original document, furthering the work of human rights and illuminating the ideal of global citizenship. What does it mean for each of us to be members of a global community? Since 1948, the Declaration has stood as a beacon and a standard for a better world. Yet the work of making its ideals real is far from over. Hideous and systemic human rights abuses continue to be perpetrated at an alarming rate around the world. Too many people, particularly those in power, are hostile to human rights or indifferent to their claims. Meanwhile, our global interdependence deepens. Bringing together world leaders and thinkers in the fields of politics, ethics, and philosophy, the Commission set out to develop a common understanding of the meaning of global citizenship one that arises from basic human rights and empowers every individual in the world. This landmark report affirms the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeks to renew the 1948 enterprise, and the very ideal of the human family, for our day and generation. Members of the Global Citizenship Commission include: K. Anthony Appiah, Laurel Bellows, Nicolas Berggruen, Paul Boghossian, Gordon Brown (Chair), Craig Calhoun, Wang Chenguang, Mohamed ElBaradei, Fonna Forman, Andrew Forrest, Ronald M. George, Asma Jahangir, John Kufuor, Graça Machel, Catherine ORegan, Ricken Patel, Emma Rothschild, Robert Rubin, Jonathan Sacks, Kailash Satyarthi, Klaus Schwab , Amartya Sen, John Sexton, Robert Shrum, Jeremy Waldron, Joseph Weiler, Rowan Williams, Diane C. Yu (Executive Director).”-Source -Publisher’s press release.

Read the report here.

3.

On 9/11, the founder and president of the World Economic Forum, Klaus Schwab, was having breakfast with Rabbi Arthur Schneier at his Park East Synagogue in New York when the two jets struck the World Trade Center, Schneier said. Schneier, who heads the Appeal of Conscience Foundation, a coalition of business and religious leaders in New York, had intended to discuss increasing the participation of religious leaders at the economic forum. After the attack, the notion seemed even more urgent. With Schneier´s assistance, Schwab decided to commemorate the world disaster by moving his forum — traditionally held in the Swiss ski resort of Davos — to New York City, Schneier said. And he doubled the number of religious leaders to 40, including eight Jews. While Western nations have distanced religion from public life in recent decades, the forum´s new line is to embrace religion, understand its traditions and glean its wisdom. As international companies expand their markets and governments and corporations see peace as essential to progress, leaders increasingly are giving religion a role in enhancing international stability. – Source

That’s not surprising either if you were aware he’s also a member of the Peres Centre for Peace. Or of the Dan David Prize  he was awarded by Israel in 2004.

2.

I don’t know when you started counting, but Klaus Schwab was already at “Globalism 4.0” during the World Government Summit of 2019. Did you even know there was a World Government Summit? I admit I’ve missed this one until recently.

Indeed, he has declared “old-school” globalization completed in 2017. Plebs are still accommodating with the concept.

Source

1.

And then there’s this:

Source

Bonus fact:

I usually drop a bonus on the counter, don’t I?
Check this out:
YOU CAN’T FIND KLAUS SCHWAB’S ANCESTORS NAMES ANYWHERE ONLINE.
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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu_ Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Prepare for WEF’s attack on the Internet and power grids. But while they hold, take advantage, watch, download, share, reupload, spread the knowledge like fire!

Oh, look, mum, a new “social contract”, yay!
Before we look at it below, note that none of us has knowingly signed a contract with or voted for these WEF creeps. And yet….

* The Great Reset and The Fourth Industrial Revolution are interchangeable names

Source

“The illusion of freedom will continue for as long as it’s profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will take down the scenery, move the tables and chairs out of the way, then they will pull back the curtains and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater.”

Frank Zappa
Self-published list of national traitors fusing WEF’s Great Reset and UN’s Agenda2030
Source
Take care who shapes and resets your world-view

The correct answer to the question in our headline is:
#TheGreatAwakening


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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu_ Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Note: He’s not the famous David de Rothschild, the eco-adventurer.

This “gentleman” is also an NYT and HuffPo contributor

But David Rothschild claims to also be a Microsoft “researcher”. And most voting machines run Windows.

Source

Are we clear here? If not, maybe you should also read:
(1st Anniversary Special) Soros a Rothschild frontman, forged IMF-China alliance. We’re living the consequences


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by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu_ Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

This is a late party for Silview.media’s first anniversary. We missed the date too, in the current turmoils. But we wanted to give you a special treat.
There’s no happiness in this birthday, Covidiots stole it all, but there is a glimpse of hope, knowledge still gets through the censorship barrage and knowledge is freedom.

Show me something that cries “Made in China” louder!


So many people noticed that China and the World Bank / IMF (read Rothschild Dynasty) subjects not only stopped poking each other, they seem to dance in sync. They’re not wrong, Kissinger has been working on this for over 50 years now and then Soros upped the game until the balance tilted in 2015, the year of the WB/IMF Summit (clan gathering) in Hong Kong.

DID TRUMP REALLY GIVE THE MIDDLE FINGER TO THE GREAT RESET? [RO SUBS]
How about Operation Warp Speed and the billions he spent on vaccines from taxpayer money?
You can take one thing to the World Bank though: The US elections outcome is determined by how efficient were the people behind The Great Reset in their machinations. They spent enormous resources to take Trump down and it would be a great joy for many people if all that globalist “sweat” went down the drain.

UPDATE: Looks like we already have an answer to the question in the tile of the above video:

China Daily columnist


Don’t believe what we say, research what we say and make your own minds is our motto, and for the coming year we’ll make it more visible.
But in this post it’s not us saying any of this stuff… In fact this write up is done.

2010: “We need a NWO with China among leaders”
WB President: “We’re living in a time bomb”
Biden: “I had many 24h dinners with China President Xi” (WEF Forum Davos 2016)
Precisely 1 year ago
Real eyes realize. Source
China Daily columnist
Source
Read
1912 newspaper cartoon

bonus

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Cllck the button below to download the whole article

ALSO READ:

ATOMIC BOMBSHELL: ROTHSCHILDS PATENTED COVID-19 BIOMETRIC TESTS IN 2015. AND 2017.

[EXCLUSIVE] FINAL EVIDENCE COVID-19 IS A ‘SIMEX’ – PLANNED SIMULATION EXERCISE BY WHO AND WORLD BANK

HENRY KISSINGER: “I USED TO ASSIGN MAO’S WRITINGS TO MY CLASSES AT HARVARD”

DEMOCRACY? WE’RE OFFICIALLY 15 MONTHS INTO THE 4TH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION AND YOUR GOVERNMENT TOLD YOU NOTHING

BILLIONAIRES – MOST INVESTED PEOPLE IN CLIMATE ALARMISM


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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them

by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu

This life-changing information has been sitting on UK Government’s website for over 15 months now. People find out about it from us, while their officials keep yapping 24/7 about an infection we can’t test for and a virus that’s never been properly isolated and purified in a lab as per Koch’s Postulate.
Of course, this plan is not limited to UK, it’s global.
Looks like democracy is as real as Rona, your informed consent matters and governments care.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is not a buzzword, it’s official policy in every state controlled by the World Bank /IMF / Rothschild dynasty. It’s been so for long now. And The Great Reset gives you the map for it, in that Technocrat language that is translated to functional-illiterate sheeple as whatever they need to hear to stay obedient, while the sheeple-herders get actual live-stock management advice.

Policy paper

Regulation for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Published 11 June 2019

Presented to Parliament
by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
by Command of Her Majesty

Excerpts selected by Silview.media, read the whole thing please!

Foreword

The world is changing faster than ever. New technology is creating new industries, changing existing ones and transforming the way things are made. We need a more agile approach to regulation, that supports innovation while protecting citizens and the environment.

We are a nation of innovators. Throughout our history we have seized the opportunities to create a better future for ourselves. In the First Industrial Revolution, British engineer Thomas Savery’s pump paved the way for industrial use of steam power. In the second, British scientist Michael Faraday’s electromagnetic rotary devices formed the basis for practical electricity use. In the third, British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web.

Technological breakthroughs in areas from artificial intelligence to biotechnologies are now heralding a Fourth Industrial Revolution, with the power to reshape almost every sector in every country. Our Industrial Strategy positions the UK to make the most of this global transformation.

Our regulatory system is second to none, as recognised by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Regulatory Policy Outlook in 2018. It protects citizens and enables business to thrive. Together with our global research prowess, world-class universities and open, competitive markets, it attracts firms to innovate and invest in the UK. As the Fourth Industrial Revolution changes the way we live and work, it is vital that our regulatory system keeps pace.

This white paper sets out our plan to maintain our world-leading regulatory system in this period of rapid technological change. We will support and stimulate new products, services and business models, with greater space for experimentation. We will uphold safeguards for people and the environment and engage the public in how innovation is regulated. And we will maintain the stable, proportionate regulatory approach the UK is rightly known for.

Our openness to technology and innovation continues as we leave the European Union.

This white paper is our plan to secure our success.

Rt Hon Greg Clark MP
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Championing innovation

We need to take action to maintain our world-beating regulatory system and realise the potential of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is of a scale, speed and complexity that is unprecedented. It is characterised by a fusion of technologies – such as artificial intelligence, gene editing and advanced robotics – that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital and biological worlds. It will disrupt nearly every industry in every country, creating new opportunities and challenges for people, places and businesses to which we must respond.

Our modern Industrial Strategy seeks to put the UK at the crest of this global wave of technological innovation, bringing the benefits to business and consumers alike. Our foundations are strong. The UK ranks in the top 5 in the Global Innovation Index1. We are a global leader in science and research and home to 4 of the top 10 universities in the world2. We have a thriving start-up environment and are home to many of the world’s most R&D-intensive businesses. We develop and attract some of the most talented people in the world.

We want to build on our strengths in developing and deploying ideas to become the world’s most innovative economy. We want to raise our total investment in R&D to 2.4% of GDP by 2027, the biggest increase on record. We have set 4 Grand Challenges for the UK government and wider economy to seize the opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The Industrial Strategy Grand Challenges

  1. We will put the UK at the forefront of the artificial intelligence and data revolution.
  2. We will maximise the advantages for UK industry of the shift to clean growth.
  3. We will become a world leader in shaping the future of mobility.
  4. We will harness the power of innovation to help meet the needs of an ageing society.

Our regulatory system is a national asset. We are ranked 9th among 190 economies for the ease of doing business in the UK3, with the quality of our regulatory practices given the highest overall country score by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)4. We protect the natural environment and ensure the safety and employment rights of citizens. We also provide the certainty needed for businesses to thrive.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution presents challenges for regulatory systems across the globe, as they struggle to keep pace with rapid, complex technological innovation. In our Industrial Strategy, we committed to develop an agile regulatory approach that supports innovation and protects citizens and the environment. We need to act now to maintain our world-beating regulatory system in this period of transformational change.

regulations

We need to reshape our regulatory approach so that it supports and stimulates innovation that benefits citizens and the economy. At present, only 29% of businesses believe that the government’s approach to regulation facilitates innovative products and services being efficiently brought to market 9. The need for reform is urgent: 92% of businesses from a range of sectors think they will feel a negative impact if regulators don’t evolve to keep pace with disruptive change in the next 2 to 3 years10.

Other countries are rapidly reforming their regulatory environments to support future innovation, with Nesta describing these anticipatory approaches as ‘an increasingly important source of competitive advantage in the global economy’11. By taking an anticipatory approach we can give people faster access to innovations that can transform their lives and attract the ideas, talent and investment to the UK that will drive our future prosperity.

We are turning things round. The Financial Conduct Authority’s regulatory sandbox has kick-started a wave of regulator-led initiatives to support new products and services to come to market and been widely emulated across the globe. Our Regulators’ Pioneer Fund is accelerating the change, with £10 million invested in 15 projects to support technologies from autonomous shipping to virtual lawyers. We have established a partnership with the World Economic Forum to shape the global governance of technological innovation.

But we can go further. The Business Secretary has established a Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation to drive reform across government to put us at the forefront of the industries of the future. The Prime Minister’s Council for Science and Technology has provided recommendations on how to enhance the regulatory oversight of technological innovation. We have identified 6 challenges we need to address:

  • we need to be on the front foot in reforming regulation in response to technological innovation
  • we need to ensure that our regulatory system is sufficiently flexible and outcomes-focused to enable innovation to thrive
  • we need to enable greater experimentation, testing and trialling of innovations under regulatory supervision
  • we need to support innovators to navigate the regulatory landscape and comply with regulation
  • we need to build dialogue with society and industry on how technological innovation should be regulated
  • we need to work with partners across the globe to reduce regulatory barriers to trade in innovative products and services

This white paper sets out our plan to tackle these 6 challenges and seize the opportunity presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. We want to lead the world in innovation-friendly regulation that supports the emergence of new products, services and business models for the benefit of all. The white paper will be matched later this year with papers describing how we will modernise consumer and competition regulation in response to the transformation in our economy.

Supporting the emergence of smart systems

Our energy system is changing rapidly. There is more low carbon generation, such as power from solar and wind, which produces different amounts of electricity depending on the weather. It is increasingly decentralised, with generation and batteries located in or near people’s homes and businesses.   New technologies such as electricity storage, smart heating controls and electric vehicles are emerging which can be used to help balance the electricity system. However, our regulatory system was not developed with these new technologies in mind. 

As laid out in the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, developed jointly with the energy regulator Ofgem, we are working to develop a best in class regulatory framework that supports these innovations. We are working with industry to reform markets, legislation, licences, codes and standards.

The drive towards a smart and flexible energy system is an important tenet of the government’s Clean Growth and Industrial Strategies. The changes promise to provide significant public benefits, from lower energy bills to cleaner air and lower carbon emissions. By 2050, a smarter and more flexible system could save the UK £17-40 billion.

Accelerating the introduction of self-driving vehicles

The Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAV) is overseeing a groundbreaking programme to prepare the UK’s regulatory framework for self-driving vehicles ahead of their introduction on UK roads. It has developed an open regulatory approach that safeguards citizens and supports the development of the technology as it evolves.

This includes the recently updated world-leading Code of Practice for testing automated vehicles. Testing any level of automated vehicles on public roads is possible, provided they comply with the law, including having a driver, in or out of the vehicle, a roadworthy vehicle, and appropriate insurance. The recent update to the Code announced that the government would introduce an application process for more advanced trials. This will facilitate the development of the technology, without the need for repeated changes to regulation.

CCAV is leading the charge in considering the wider implications of the introduction of self-driving vehicles. It has introduced legislation to insure the use of self-driving vehicles through the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018, so that victims of collisions get quick and easy access to compensation. It has asked the Law Commission of England and Wales and the Scottish Law Commission to undertake a joint regulatory review to identify further legal obstacles to the widespread introduction of self-driving vehicles. This project is consulting widely and will provide a final report in 2021.

CCAV is also working with the British Standards Institution to deliver a programme of standards to help accelerate development and deployment of self-driving vehicles. The programme seeks to address public safety and reliability concerns and supports the UK’s reputation as a centre of excellence for vehicle testing, design and manufacturing.

CCAV’s programme has helped to put the UK at the forefront of this emerging industry and, with the Department for Transport, given the UK lasting influence in international debates on the regulation of automated vehicles.

Our plan

We will create an outcome-focused, flexible regulatory system that enables innovation to thrive while protecting citizens and the environment. We will match this with clarity for business through better use of regulatory guidance, codes of practice and industry standards.

We will pilot an innovation test so that the impact of legislation on innovation is considered as we:

  • develop and assess policy options
  • consult and engage on policy proposals
  • design, introduce and implement legislation
  • monitor, evaluate and review legislation

We will encourage policymakers to consider the governance of innovation in a holistic way, noting the role that alternatives to regulation can play in providing government, citizens and businesses with assurance. We will encourage policymakers to reflect on when the right time is to introduce regulation21 .

Our approach will encourage policymakers to focus on real-world outcomes, with legislation that provides flexibility for experimentation and adaptation. Prescriptive regulatory requirements would only be set out in legislation where necessary to provide important protections. Where possible, alternative approaches such as statutory guidance will set out requirements so that as technology changes the system can respond in a timely and flexible manner.

We will develop tools for policymakers to support them to consider these issues; we will also develop improved analytical methods to capture the impact of regulation on innovation. During the pilot, we will invite the Regulatory Policy Committee to scrutinise the application of the innovation test, to ensure that innovators have confidence in how government is developing significant new regulatory legislation.

Making the UK the safest place in the world to be online

The internet is a powerful force for good. Combined with new technologies such as artificial intelligence, it is changing society perhaps more than any previous technological revolution – growing the economy, making us more productive, and raising living standards.

Alongside these new opportunities come new challenges and risks. The internet can be used to spread terrorist material; it can be a tool for abuse and bullying; and it can be used to undermine civil discourse, objective news and intellectual property. As set out in our Digital Charter, we are committed to making the UK both the safest place to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business.

In April, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Home Office published a white paper to tackle a range of both legal and illegal harms, from cyberbullying to online child sexual exploitation. In keeping with our ambition to lead the world in innovation-friendly regulation that encourages the tech sector and provides stability for businesses, the white paper sets out an outcomes-focused legislative approach that will support future technological change.

Read more

Realising the power of financial technologies

From AI to blockchain, data-driven financial technologies (FinTech) are changing the way that we bank, invest, insure and even pay for things. The UK’s FinTech sector is booming, underpinned by our world-leading financial services sector and thriving tech scene.

In 2016, the Financial Conduct Authority seized the initiative to support this emerging industry by establishing the world’s first ‘regulatory sandbox’: a safe space where firms can work with the regulator to trial innovative products, services and business models with consumers without having to meet all the usual requirements for compliance. Since its establishment, the sandbox has received more than 3 times as many applications than places available. Access to the sandbox has helped reduce the time and cost of getting innovative ideas to market (in the first year, 90% of firms progressed towards wider market launch) and improve access to finance (40% received investment during or following their sandbox tests).

FinTech firm Asset Hedge introduced a web-based platform offering forex options to assist small businesses and individuals to protect against losses incurred because of currency fluctuations. They successfully completed the sandbox programme to become a fully regulated company. Assure Hedge founder and chief executive Barry McCarthy said:

“We have effectively been given the same regulation that large banks have, so it really allows us to compete with the big players.”

It’s not just business that benefits. Consumers benefit from new products which have better safeguards built in up front, while the regulator benefits from greater insight into technological innovation. The model has been emulated by more than 20 countries across the globe and translated to sectors from health to transport.

From smart shipping to AI-powered legal services

The Regulators’ Pioneer Fund is backing the Future of Mobility and AI and Data Grand Challenges through ground breaking projects to enable technologies from smart shipping to AI-powered legal services.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has already taken steps to facilitate innovation in the legal industry, inviting firms to develop new business models in a controlled way. The Regulators’ Pioneer Fund investment will enable the Solicitors Regulation Authority to work with the innovation foundation Nesta to accelerate ethical AI-powered innovations, with a focus on legal services for small businesses and consumers where AI and automation can have transformative impact.

Paul Philip, Chief Executive of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, said:

“Smart use of technology could help tackle the problem that far too many people struggle to access expert legal advice. It will help us further build on our work to encourage new ways of delivering legal services, benefiting both the public and small business.”

In the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund investment will create the Maritime Autonomy Regulation Lab (MAR Lab) to bring together industry specialists, academics and government to pioneer new regulatory approaches and make data available to the emerging smart shipping industry.

The project will inform UK legislation for a domestic framework for autonomous vessels to attract international business and support and promote testing in the UK’s territorial waters. It will also support government efforts to establish a new proactive and adaptive international regulatory framework for autonomous vessels at the International Maritime Organisation.

Read: THE ROADMAP FOR THE 2025-2028 PANDEMIC ALREADY PUBLISHED BY EVENT 201 ORGANISERS

Supporting the revolution in life sciences

New discoveries and the application of new technologies mean we can diagnose illnesses earlier and more accurately, create new treatments and ensure existing ones are more effective.

The UK is extraordinarily well placed to play a leading role in this revolution in the life sciences, with strengths in innovation, research, healthcare and business. To support these innovations to come to market, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency’s (MHRA) Innovation Office provides a single point of access to regulatory advice on the development of innovative medicines, medical devices or manufacturing processes. The service has grown in popularity since its inception in 2013, receiving 190 enquiries in 2018.

The service helps to make regulatory information clear and accessible to those who are working on innovative research, supporting a key goal in the second Life Sciences Sector Deal to ensure the UK remains one of the best places in the world to develop life sciences projects, to protect health and improve lives.

The service has helped secure significant investments into the UK life sciences industry. John Parker, Director at AstraZeneca said:

“We genuinely believe that having easy access to MHRA in this manner provides a real competitive advantage to UK based companies”

In the Life Sciences Sector Deal, the MHRA committed to engage with industry to understand how it can further develop its offer by the end of 2019.

Our plan

Entrepreneurs and innovative firms should be able to find their way through the UK’s regulatory landscape with ease and receive timely, joined-up feedback on novel propositions.

We will consult on a digital Regulation Navigator for businesses to help them find their way through the regulatory landscape and engage with the right regulators at the right time on their proposals. We will ensure that this is integrated with action to enhance the government’s digital offer to business in areas such as tax, grants, trade and investment, and build awareness of the available offer.

Initiatives such as the Financial Conduct Authority’s regulatory sandbox have helped reduce the time and cost of bringing new products and services to market and enabled businesses to win contracts and secure access to finance. We are funding greater investment in specialist regulatory advice services for innovators through our Regulators’ Pioneer Fund, to ensure that innovators who are developing novel proposals with potential for wider economic, societal or environmental benefit are supported to do so.

Leading the public dialogue on mitochondrial replacement treatment

Mitochondria are present in almost all human cells and generate the majority of their energy supply. Unhealthy mitochondria can cause genetic disorders known as mitochondrial disease, which can have devastating effects on the families that carry them. For many patients with mitochondrial diseases, preventing the transmission of the disease to their children is a key concern.

In 2012, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority undertook a sustained engagement programme to determine public acceptability of the use of mitochondrial replacement treatment, characterised in the media as ‘3 parent babies’. The programme included a breadth of engagement tools, including workshops, a public survey, open meetings and focus groups. It invited trusted scientific figures to take part in the debate.

The regulator found that despite certain ethical concerns there was general support for permitting mitochondria replacement in the UK, so long as it is safe enough to offer in a treatment setting and is done so within a regulatory framework. Following legislation, in 2017 the UK became the first country in the world to license mitochondrial donation techniques to allow women who carry the risk of serious mitochondrial disease to avoid passing it onto their children.

Our plan

We want innovators and the public to have confidence in the UK’s regulatory regime. We will build dialogue with society and industry on how technological innovation should be regulated.

We will ask the Regulatory Horizons Council to identify priorities for greater public engagement on regulation of innovation. For example, where technologies pose complex ethical or moral considerations greater public engagement may be appropriate to shape government thinking on appropriate regulatory frameworks. Government departments and regulators will continue to lead public engagement on their policies, working with expert bodies such as the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation.

As part of its role, the Better Regulation Executive will provide support, advice and share best practice with policymakers and regulators on public engagement techniques to support appropriate regulation of technological innovation, working with partners such as Sciencewise. The Better Regulation Executive will build capability in novel and creative public engagement techniques that go beyond public consultation in this important area.

Engaging the public on regulation of drones

Drone technology is advancing rapidly with the potential to perform critical services in everyday life – from transporting urgent medical supplies to bridge inspection and repair. UK cities and regions need to consider what they want the future of drone applications to look like. PwC estimates that by 2030 drone use could increase UK GDP by £42 billion.

With support from the government’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, the innovation foundation Nesta funded public use analysis of drones in 5 cities for activities from inspecting burning buildings to traffic incident response. It worked with the government and the Civil Aviation Authority and convened local stakeholders to assess demand and identified the technical, economic and regulatory success factors for safe drone deployment at scale in cities.

The programme has concluded that there is demand for drones, which can fulfil socially beneficial goals. However, there are regulatory challenges that need to be solved – from how to deploy drones over long distances to what is publicly acceptable in terms of noise, privacy, safety and other issues. These issues are being considered as part of the Department for Transport’s Aviation Strategy 2050 green paper, looking at how a flexible regulatory framework can be established to support transport innovation under the Future of Mobility Grand Challenge and beyond.

.

Illustration of a city of the future. (Credit: Innovate UK).
Credit: Innovate UK

Setting global standards on smart cities

Many cities face challenges in ensuring sustainable growth, with issues ranging from provision of water and energy to management of healthcare and transport. A range of innovation is emerging to create the smart cities of the future.

The British Standards Institution has developed a ground-breaking series of standards on smart cities, in collaboration with the Future Cities Catapult. International recognition of the smart cities standards programme contributes to the UK’s reputation in advanced urban services and helps shape the global market in line with established UK good practice.

Downloaded in over 60 countries, UK smart city standards are being adopted as international standards. In China, the world’s largest smart cities market, the British Standards Institution has set up a cooperation agreement on smart cities with the Standards Administration of China to develop a common approach to smart cities between UK and Chinese cities and companies.

Conclusion

This white paper is our long-term strategy for maintaining our world-leading regulatory environment as we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation will drive its delivery, supported by the Better Regulation Executive.

The white paper is a plan for the whole of government, shaping how we will regulate in areas from healthcare to transport. We want to give businesses confidence to innovate and invest in the UK and give citizens confidence in our protections.

In addressing these issues we respect the devolution settlements with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. We will work with our partners in the devolved administrations and local authorities to share our innovation-enabling approach and ensure that every part of the UK benefits from the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Summary of commitments

Facing the future

  • We will establish a Regulatory Horizons Council to identify the implications of technological innovation and advise the government on regulatory reform needed to support its rapid and safe introduction.
  • The Council will prepare a regular report on innovation across the economy, with recommendations on priorities for regulatory reform to put the UK at the forefront of the industries of the future.
  • The Ministerial Working Group on Future Regulation, chaired by the Business Secretary, will oversee the government response to the Council’s recommendations.

Focusing on outcomes

  • We will pilot an innovation test so that the impact of legislation on innovation is considered during the development of policy, introduction and implementation of legislation and its evaluation and review.
  • During the pilot, we will invite the Regulatory Policy Committee to scrutinise the application of the innovation test, to ensure that innovators have confidence in how government is developing new legislation.
  • We will promote new ways to trigger when post-implementation reviews of legislation are undertaken to ensure that legislation does not inadvertently ‘lock in’ outdated technologies or approaches.
  • We will develop tools for regulators to support them to review their guidance, codes of practice and other regulatory mechanisms to ensure that they provide flexibility for those businesses that want to innovate, while ensuring a clear route to compliance.
  • We will support business, policymakers and regulators to make effective use of standards where appropriate as a complement to legislation.
  • We will invite the Office for Product Safety and Standards, British Standards Institution, National Physical Laboratory and UK Accreditation Service to set out their vision for how the development and review of standards should evolve as we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Supporting experimentation

  • We will examine the case for expanding the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund in future to help regulators to keep pace with technological innovation and enable the emergence of new products, services and business models.
  • We will examine the case for extending the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund to local authorities in future, in order to help them support greater testing and trialling of innovations in their area.
  • We have established a Regulators’ Innovation Network to help foster a culture of experimentation across regulators and share best practice.
  • We will ask regulators to go further to evaluate the impact of their initiatives on innovation and consider whether to commence statutory reporting requirements for regulators on the impact of the economic growth duty.
  • We will survey innovators and regulators to identify data that could be shared to enable disruptors to enter markets and deliver better outcomes for all.

Improving access

  • We will consult on a digital Regulation Navigator for businesses to help them find their way through the regulatory landscape and engage with the right regulators at the right time on their proposals.
  • We have financed greater investment in specialist regulatory advice services for innovators through the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund.
  • We will scope and consult on measures to enhance co-ordination between regulators to ensure that innovations are guided smoothly through the system.
  • We will consider whether the Regulation Navigator should include functions for businesses to raise where rules or processes are inappropriately constraining innovation, so that regulators can review, clarify and potentially amend their approach.
  • We will invite regulators to develop metrics on the service that they provide to innovators.
  • We will ensure that data from specialist advice services is fed into the Regulatory Horizons Council, so that it can advise on where regulatory change or additional investment may be needed to enable innovation to thrive.

Building dialogue

  • We will ask the Regulatory Horizons Council to identify priorities for greater public engagement on regulation of innovation.
  • We will provide support, advice and share best practice with policymakers and regulators on public engagement techniques to support appropriate regulation of technological innovation.
  • We will encourage regulators to build public dialogue into experimentation initiatives (such as those financed through the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund), so that public views are considered as new products, services and business models are trialled.

Leading the world

  • We have established a partnership with the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution in San Francisco to develop regulatory approaches for new technologies.
  • We are working with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to explore the regulatory challenges of the emerging digital economy.
  • We will improve awareness of the effects of regulation on trade among government departments and regulators so that the impacts of regulatory divergence are systematically considered.
  • We will seek to include ambitious chapters on good regulatory practices and regulatory co-operation in future free trade agreements that the UK negotiates following our exit from the European Union.
  • We will continue working alongside other nations in the international and regional standards organisations, to help secure globally accepted standards for innovators to collaborate effectively in international markets.

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by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu

I’ve shown you in my previous articles that the weather and the climate are cash-cows for the financial elites whether they cool down or heat up. And you thought pandemics are anything less? I’m afraid not….

On June 28, 2017, The World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development) launched specialized bonds aimed at providing financial support to the Pandemic Emergency Financing Facility (PEF), a facility created by the World Bank to channel surge funding to developing countries facing the risk of a pandemic.

“This marks the first time that World Bank bonds are being used to finance efforts against infectious diseases, and the first time that pandemic risk in low-income countries is being transferred to the financial markets.”

The World Bank – June 28, 2017

Going through the IMF/IBRD official press-release published with the launch of this financial “A-Team”, it didn’t take long to spot something very interesting:

Source

 World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said. “We are moving away from the cycle of panic and neglect that has characterized so much of our approach to pandemics. We are leveraging our capital market expertise, our deep understanding of the health sector, our experience overcoming development challenges, and our strong relationships with donors and the insurance industry to serve the world’s poorest people. This creates an entirely new market for pandemic risk insurance. Drawing on lessons from the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa, the Facility will help improve health security for everyone. I especially want to thank the World Health Organization and the governments of Japan and Germany for their support in launching this new mechanism.”

The World Bank announced the creation of the PEF in May 2016 at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Governors meeting in Sendai, Japan. The PEF will quickly channel funding to countries facing a major disease outbreak with pandemic potential. “Its unique financing structure combines funding from the bonds issued today with over-the-counter derivatives that transfer pandemic outbreak risk to derivative counterparties. The structure was designed to attract a wider, more diverse set of investors.”

According to The World Bank, the PEF has two windows. The first is an ‘insurance’ window with premiums funded by Japan and Germany, consisting of bonds and swaps including those executed today. The second is a ‘cash’ window, for which Germany provided initial funding of Euro 50 million. The cash window will be available from 2018 for the containment of diseases that may not be eligible for funding under the insurance window.

The bonds and derivatives for the PEF’s ‘insurance’ window were developed by the World Bank Treasury in cooperation with leading reinsurance companies Swiss Re and Munich Re. AIR Worldwide was the sole modeler, using the AIR Pandemic Model to provide expert risk analysis. Swiss Re Capital Markets is the sole book runner for the transaction. Swiss Re Capital Markets and Munich Re are the joint structuring agents. Munich Re and GC Securities, a division of MMC Securities LLC are co-managers.

Swiss Re Capital Markets Limited, Munich Re and GC Securities were also joint arrangers on the derivatives transactions.

The bonds will be issued under IBRD’s “capital at risk” program because investors bear the risk of losing part or all of their investment in the bond if an epidemic event triggers pay-outs to eligible countries covered under the PEF.

The PEF covers six viruses that are most likely to cause a pandemic. These include new Orthomyxoviruses (new influenza pandemic virus A), Coronaviridae (SARS, MERS), Filoviridae (Ebola, Marburg) and other zoonotic diseases (Crimean Congo, Rift Valley, Lassa fever).

PEF financing to eligible countries will be triggered when an outbreak reaches predetermined levels of contagion, including number of deaths; the speed of the spread of the disease; and whether the disease crosses international borders. The determinations for the trigger are made based on publicly available data as reported by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Countries eligible for financing under the PEF’s insurance window are members of the International Development Association (IDA), the institution of the World Bank Group that provides concessional finance for the world’s poorest countries. The PEF will be governed by a Steering Body, whose voting members include Japan and Germany. WHO and the World Bank serve as non-voting members.

In the past ten years, The World Bank brags about having has executed close to $2 billion in catastrophe risk transactions.

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! Articles can always be subject of later editing as a way of perfecting them